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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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may not be correct, but in view of the declarations of the President that no act of coercion or irritation is intended, are most likely to prove the true version. Fort Sumter. It appears that there is serious trouble at Fort Sumter, and that much of the military and naval movement now in rapid progress on the part of the Government here is destined for that quarter. An officer of the army stated to me this afternoon that the first collision would, in all probability, occur in Charleston harbor. The Government, he says, having decided some days ago to evacuate Fort Sumter, were about sending an order detailing how it should-be done, but General Beauregard, who is in command, in conjunction with Gov. Pickens, refused to accept their plan of evacuation. What the order or plan proposed by the Government here was is not fully known, but it is understood that they wanted to leave a small force to protect the property of the United States. This the Carolinians peremptorily refus