Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee River (United States) or search for Tennessee River (United States) in all documents.

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in the late train last night, states that the Federals, to the number of about 20,000, were advancing upon Paris and Danville, Tenn., and had already passed Farmington, Ky., on their way to the points designated. Farmington is in the vicinity of Paducah. When our informant passed Danville and Paris great excitement prevailed, and the Federals were hourly expected. It is supposed that the 20,000 here spoken of constitute a part of the immense force which lately left Cairo for Tennessee river, the remainder having probably been detailed to look after Forts Henry and Donelson which at last accounts, were still in the quiet possession of our troops, who, confident of success, anxiously a wait the approach of the enemy. If the Federal should reach Danville and Paris, they will undoubtedly seek to destroy the railroad and telegraphic lines, and thus out off communication between Memphis and Bowling Green. A few days — perhaps a few hours — may bring startling intelligence.
No appearance of Federal vessels at Paducah — the Yankee force in Murray — Early movements looked for. Nashville, January 23. --The Fort Henry correspondent of the Nashville Union and American says, that the Confederate steamer Dunbar went down the Tennessee river on Saturday last within twenty-five miles of Paducah, and reports that no Federal gun-boats were seen. Scouts from Fort Henry report the Federal force in Murray, Kentucky, to be between six and ten thousand infantry, two thousand cavalry, and thirteen pieces of artillery. The heavy rains on the 19th and 20th instant rendered the water courses and roads almost impassable, and greatly impeded their movements. The intelligence direct from Green river is, that the Federals intend making early forward movements, and they have commenced the erection of fortifications on the South bank of the river. The heavy freshet in the Green river had washed away Gen. Buell's pontoon bridges, and also damaged the woo
Ten thousand Yankees near the Tennessee river. Memphis, Jan. 28. --Passengers by the cars last night report that there are 10,000 Yankees four miles south of the Tennessee river and sixteen miles north of Paris. Their heavy artillery is stuck in the mud, and unable to be moved forward. The Confederates are collecting there from different points. Ten thousand Yankees near the Tennessee river. Memphis, Jan. 28. --Passengers by the cars last night report that there are 10,000 Yankees four miles south of the Tennessee river and sixteen miles north of Paris. Their heavy artillery is stuck in the mud, and unable to be moved forward. The Confederates are collecting there from different points.