Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Department de Ville de Paris (France) or search for Department de Ville de Paris (France) in all documents.

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their widely-recognized talents ensure them employment elsewhere, if that now accorded them should ever be withdrawn. The Republic of Letters has few citizens more eligibly placed or more honorably regarded than they. Some members of this class are men of all work — ready, at the word of command, to review the most ponderous tome that embodies the latest and least intelligible speculations in German theology or Scotch metaphysics — to report a masquerade-ball, or to chronicle the latest Paris fashions; but the better, if not more numerous, class do that work only (or mainly) for which they are specially qualified, and to which they are attracted by their studies, or their tastes — often by both. In the protracted, arduous struggle which resulted in the overthrow and extinction of American Slavery, many were honorably conspicuous: some by eloquence; more by diligence; others by fearless, absorbing, single-eyed devotion to the great end; but he who most skillfully, effectively, <
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
the Ostend Conference? Might not such a volume have persuaded a certain Secretary of Legation not to desecrate the sacred seal of Columbia? Might it not have wheedled and coaxed another Secretary of Legation into paying his debts before leaving Paris, so that shopmen would not then have inquired of every American purchaser, when the American Diplomatist intended to return? Pray let us have The Diplomatist's own Book! We have been betrayed into these suggestions by seeing mentioned in the nce of the vernacular of Gaul, he has shown a great desire to acquit himself creditably, by arraying himself upon court-days in the small-clothes and cocked-hat proscribed by the late Mr. Marcy. It is also understood that he would rather stay in Paris than come home, for a reason that he has; that he is not personally a devotee of the principle of rotation, and that as for resigning he will see Mr. Buchanan----first. But this is a weakness, if it be a weakness, with the whole diplomatic bod
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Union for the Union. (search)
tice upon their side, we are that people. There isn't a morality, however trite, or however rare, that does not attach to our cause. We have with us truth, justice, honor; but, alas! these do not prevent us from cutting a very shabby figure in Paris or London when the news is against us. The Rebels have lied, stolen, perjured themselves, and have tens of thousands of murders to answer for, but bustling men of the Bourse, and the Bulls and Bears of the London Stock Exchange, have had dealingsplies — wherever they find them. Whoever is bold enough to imply, even by silence, his dissatisfaction, does so at his personal peril. For him the tar-pot seethes and the rope is already twisted. The masses submit to tyrannies which the mob of Paris would not endure for a day; and the Slave Power, when it ruled the Union, exercised a sway less imperious than it has now assumed. No one, however hearty may be his detestation of despotism, can deny that it is sometimes terribly effective. T