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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
the President. Colonel Morrow, a Republican officer, is travelling through the country, and reporting on affairs to General Sherman. Morrow reports, according to his observation, that the South is loyal to the Union, but opposed to scalawags and carpet-baggers. The Republican majority in Congress, scared by the November elections, have appointed a committee to visit New Orleans and look into the state of things. Three members of this committee, Foster of Ohio, a Republican, Phelps of New Jersey, a Republican, and Potter of New York, a Democrat, are in the city taking evidence, and the two Republicans hardly hide their agreement with the Democrat, that the attempt to govern through the aid of Federal soldiery is the cause of all the disorder seen about the Gulf. With critics so unfriendly to disarm, it is Kellogg's policy to seek some safe and legal ground; but where in Louisiana can intruders like Kellogg find that safe and legal ground? McEnery is not only stronger in votes
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 8: the Conservatives. (search)
sition to the State government by Kellogg and Antoine cannot be put down.... The present State government cannot maintain itself in power a single hour without the protection of Federal troops. . . . The State government has not the confidence and respect of any portion of the community. General Sherman has sent these warnings on to Washington, marked by him with the significant words- for the personal perusal of General Grant. What say the Sub-Committee? Foster of Ohio, and Phelps of New Jersey, agree with Potter of New York, in a Report to Congress, setting forth these five facts: First: that the late election was mainly a fair one; Second : that no unusual pressure was put on coloured voters; Third: that many of the Negroes wish to get rid of Kellogg; Fourth: that the Returning Board was unlawfully constituted and made false returns; Fifth: that the Assembly was transacting business when De Trobriand drove the Conservative Members out of their seats by force.
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Charleston. (search)
inst their brethren in the South? Guess that was long ago. That dead and buried. I am speaking of to-day. We coloured people vote the Republican ticket. When they get in, by coloured votes, they give us nothing. We have a White Governor, a White Secretary of the Commonwealth, a White Chief-Justice. Would you like to have a Black Chief-Justice in the seat of Daniel Agnew Well, sah, might we not have a coloured councillor, a coloured letter-carrier, a coloured policeman? In New Jersey, just across the Delaware, you see coloured police-officers and coloured magistrates. In Pennsylvania, though we call ourselves Republicans, we have no coloured men in office, save the turnkeys in the police-yard, and these coloured officers are required to sweep their own rooms and whitewash their own walls! Is that equality? Griffin is frank. Not having learned the art of wrapping up ugly things in golden words, he tells you that he wants to get his hands into the public chest.
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 29: fair women. (search)
blic as a whole is poor, nearly half the States are rich, some of them over-rich. In seventeen states, and in the district of Columbia, there are more women than men. In some of these states the difference is slight. For instance, in the great State of Pennsylvania, counting more than three million five hundred thousand souls, there is a difference in the sexes of only one in the thousand souls. Maine and Mississippi show the same result. In Louisiana there is a difference of three; in New Jersey of seven; in Tennessee of nine, in each thousand souls. But in several of the older states, the excess of female numbers runs very high; in some beyond that of Great Britain and Ireland. In every thousand souls of the United Kingdom, there are four hundred and eighty-six males to five hundred and fourteen females; a difference in the thousand of twenty-eight, where Prussia shows a difference of thirteen. In every thousand souls of Massachusetts there are four hundred and eighty-three m