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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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le — it is a free press — of the conduct of the war in the field. It quotes from a dispatch from Indianapolis in the Cincinnati Commercial, declaring that "Kirby Smith's armies have been driven between our army and the Ohio river; that an engagement is imminent; that they cannot escape," and remarks: It strikes us that the loyal public has already had "something too much of this. " Gen. McClellan on Sunday telegraphed to Washington that Stuart's cavalry, who made the bold raid into Pennsylvania, would certainly be bagged; but they weren't. We have had promise enough from Buell; where is the performance? On Wednesday, the 8th inst., he allowed a part of his army to be attacked in overwhelming force by the rebels. They were fatally repulsed, but not till they had disabled twelve honored to fifteen hundred Union soldiers, including several of our best officers. It is said that the rebel loss was larger than our's; but where is the evidence? Did we take any rebel guns? Did
y a movement in the direction of Williamsport, and there they still remain. In the skirmish of Thursday we loss one man killed and several wounded, while the enemy's loss has not yet been ascertained, though it is thought to have been considerably more than ours. On Friday Gen. Jackson drove the enemy across the river at Williamsport; but it is impossible to find out what losses were sustained on either side. It is asserted by some who were with Gen. Stuart in his late visit to Pennsylvania, that the people were utterly terror-stricken on his approach, and offered all they possessed to be spared with life. But the magnanimous man and incomparable General had a richer boon to bestow upon them, unworthy as they are. Horses were what he went for, and horses he obtained — horses of all sizes, shapes and colors. He spared not Mynheers, neither did he forbade the dashing equine of the sleek old farmer, who loved his steed more than his country. Many of the horses were large and
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1862., [Electronic resource], A Highly interesting Yankee account of Stuart's raid into Chambersburg — the Entrance of the rebels — their Behavior, &c. (search)
A Highly interesting Yankee account of Stuart's raid into Chambersburg — the Entrance of the rebels — their Behavior, &c. It will be recollected that most of the dispatches apprising Gov. Curtin of the Confederate dash into Pennsylvania were signed "Col. A. K. McClure"--That officer has communicated his experience to a friend in a long letter, written in a style that shows the Colonel can appreciate a good joke. He was in command of the post at Chambersburg. The following is an extract fconversation on this point bore a striking similarity to the speeches of Frank Hughes and Charles J. Biddle, and had you heard them converse without seeing them, you would have supposed that I was having a friendly confab with a little knot of Pennsylvania Breckinridge politicians. Of the two, I am sure you would have respected the rebels the most; for they are open foes, and seal their conviction with their lives, and they openly avow their greater respect for open, unqualified supporters of w