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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: July 1, 1863., [Electronic resource], From Gen. Lee's army — idle Rumors. (search)
From Gen. Lee's army — idle Rumors. We have received nothing reliable, in addition to what has already been published, with reference to the movements of our forces in Pennsylvania. Parties who arrived from Staunton yesterday evening, and from the lower Valley, know very little of what is transpire north of the Potomac. They only judge of the importance of the movements by the immense and valuable captures which are daily being sent South. During the day yesterday an idle rumor obtained currency that the President or Secretary of War had received a telegram from Petersburg, stating that Northern papers had been received in that city, by flag of truce, in which it was announced that the Confederate forces had occupied Harrisburg and York, Pa., and that the State buildings in the former city had been destroyed. Upon application to the authorities named, we were informed that such information had not been communicated to the Government. The President had received no dispatc
The ground in Pennsylvania. --It appears that our troops occupy points in three counties of Pennsylvania--Fulton, Franklin and Adams. Fulton, the westernmost of the three, is but thinly settled, having a population, by the census of 1850, of 7,567 on an area of 380 square miles. It is mostly mountainous, but has some fertiPennsylvania--Fulton, Franklin and Adams. Fulton, the westernmost of the three, is but thinly settled, having a population, by the census of 1850, of 7,567 on an area of 380 square miles. It is mostly mountainous, but has some fertile land in the valleys. Adams county has an area of 530 square miles, and a population of about 26,000. Gettysburg, the chief town, is a thriving place, the population having increased between 1850 and 1853 from 2,150 to 3,000. It is the seat of a Lutheran Theological Seminary and of Pennsylvania College. The former, in 18n Hagerstown, Md., to Chambersburg. Hagerstown is about eight mill northeast of Williamsport. Connellsville and Uniontown are in the southwestern part of Pennsylvania in the direction of Pittsburg. General Imboden is, or has been, operating over-there. Uniontown is more than a hundred miles from Williams-port, in a direct
should be decided upon by those who properly have the matter in charge." If this, says the American is a fair illustration of the military spirit at Harrisburg, it would not take many rebels to sack the city. Statement of a refugee from Hancock, Maryland. A refugee from Hancock, Md., has arrived in Baltimore. The Americansays: He left Hancock on Monday morning, passing through Hagerstown, on his way to this city. His account of the movement of Ewell's division upon Pennsylvania is the most complete that has yet been given. He wished to come on in the stage coming to Frederick from Hagerstown, but on his stating that he was going home to Delaware, they refused to let him pass out of their lines, fearing he might give information to the Unionists of their movements. He managed to get through by the underground railroad, without giving any pledge, and I have thus been enabled to get the benefit of his observations. On Tuesday he saw General Rodes's division
Later from the North. our troops in Pennsylvania--Hanks's defeat at Port Hudson Admitted — Navigation of the Mississippi closed above Vicksburg — the Ravages of the rebel pirates, etc. Petersburg, June 30. --Northern dates of the 27th are received here by flag of truce. The New York Herald says the enemy progress slowly, but with a large force in Pennsylvania. Affairs at Harrisburg bear a most quiet aspect, though the country people, with droves of horses and cattlPennsylvania. Affairs at Harrisburg bear a most quiet aspect, though the country people, with droves of horses and cattle, are marching into the city in large numbers. Preparations for defence are going on rapidly. Gen. Kuips had evacuated Carlisle, but at last accounts the rebels had not occupied the town. Much perplexity exists as to the exact route the rebels have taken. Early's division is at Gettysburg, and Rodes's division is at Chambersburg. Gen. Milroy has been superceded by Col. Peirce. The Herald publishes very interesting news from Port Hudson. A second assault was made on Port H