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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 416 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 114 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 80 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 46 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 38 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Vermont (Vermont, United States) or search for Vermont (Vermont, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 208 results in 116 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
rs, or Society of Friends, had, since 1760, made slave-holding and slave-trading a matter of church discipline. The War for Independence, and the adoption of the Constitution, in 1787, which included the compromise resolution that provided for the continuation of the slave-trade, by permission, until 1808, caused very little change in the sentiment of the people, and all hoped that in some way, not yet imagined, the gradual and peaceful abolition of slavery would be accomplished. In 1777, Vermont, not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State constitution abolishing slavery. Like constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acquisition of Territory. (search)
hode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The boundaries of many of these States, as constituted by their charters, extended to the Pacific Ocean; but in practice they ceased at the Mississippi. Beyond that river the territory belonged, by discovery and settlement, to the-King of Spain. All the territory west of the present boundaries of the States was ceded by them to the United States in the order named: Virginia, 1784: Massachusetts, 1785; Connecticut, 1786 and 1800; South Carolina, 1787; North Carolina, 1790: Georgia, 1802. This ceded territory comprised part of Minnesota, all of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (see Northwest Territory), Tennessee, and a great part of Alabama and Mississippi. Vermont was admitted as a separate State in 1791; Kentucky, then a part of Virginia, in 1792; and Maine, till that time claimed by Massachusetts, in 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles, 1785-1861 (search)
Adams, Charles, 1785-1861 Lawyer: born in Arlington, Vt., March 12, 1785: educated himself for college, and was graduated at the University of Vermont in 1804. During the Canadian difficulties of 1838 he was the friend and legal adviser of General Wool, and subsequently wrote a history of the events of that uprising under the title of The patriot War. He attained a large practice in his profession, and was a voluminous contributor to periodical literature on the public events of his day. He died in Burlington, Vt., Feb. 13, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, George Burton, 1851- (search)
Adams, George Burton, 1851- Educator and historian; born in Vermont in 1851; Professor of History in Yale University. His late works include: Civilization, during the Middle ages; Why Americans dislike England; The growth of the French nation; and European history, an outline of its development.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
chief command of the State militia. Congress immediately gave him the commission of lieutenant-colonel in the Continental army. When, in the course of the war. Vermont assumed and maintained an independent position, a fruitless attempt was made by Beverly Robinson to bribe. Allen to lend his support to a union of that province fostered that impression in order to secure the neutrality of the British towards his mountain State until the close of the war. As a member of the legislature of Vermont, and as a delegate in Congress, he secured the great object of his efforts — namely, the ultimate recognition of Vermont as an independent State. He removed to BVermont as an independent State. He removed to Burlington before the close of the war, and died there Feb. 13, 1780. In 1894 the United States government established a new military post 5 miles from Burlington and named it after him. See Ethan Allen. Fort. lawyer; born in Monmouth county, N. J., May 12, 1832; was graduated at Brown University in 1860. At the beginning of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ira, 1751-1814 (search)
litary officer; a younger brother of Ethan; born in Cornwall, Conn., April 21, 1751. He was an active patriot, and took a distinguished part in public affairs in Vermont, his adopted State, where he served in the legislature, and was secretary of state, surveyor-general, and a member of the council. He was a military leader in the war for independence, and was one of the commissioners sent to Congress to oppose the claims of neighboring provinces to jurisdiction in Vermont. He effected an armistice with the British in Canada in 1781, and by so doing brought about a settlement of the controversy with New York. As senior major-general of the State militia non he was captured, taken to England, and charged with being an emissary of the French, and intending to supply the Irish malcontents with arms. After long litigation the matter was settled in Allen's favor. He wrote a National and political history of Vermont, published in London in 1798, and died in Philadelphia, Jan. 7, 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Angell, James Burrill, 1829- (search)
Angell, James Burrill, 1829- Educator and diplomatist; born in Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; was graduated at Brown University; in 1849; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Waterways from the Great Lakes to the Sea: and in 1897-98 United States minister to Turkey. He is author of numerous addresses, and magazine articles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baker, remember, (search)
Baker, remember, A captain of Green Mountain boys (q. v.); born in Woodbury, Conn., about 1740. He went to the New Hampshire Grants in 1764, before the Allens took up their abode there. He was a soldier in the French and Indian War, and was in the fierce battle at Ticonderoga in 1758. He settled at Arlington, on the Grants, and was very active with Ethan Allen in resisting the claims of New York to Vermont territory. Baker was arrested, and was cruelly treated while a prisoner, by the New-Yorkers. The government of that province had outlawed him and set a price upon his head. Captain Baker was with Allen when he took Ticonderoga, in May, 1775. He was killed, while on a scout in the Continental service, by the Indians on the Sorel, the outlet of Lake Champlain, in August, 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benedict, George Grenville, 1826- (search)
Benedict, George Grenville, 1826- Military officer; born in burlington, Vt., Dec. 10, 1826; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1847; served in the 12th Vermont Volunteers in 1862-63; and was author of Vermont at Gettysburg; Vermont in thilitary officer; born in burlington, Vt., Dec. 10, 1826; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1847; served in the 12th Vermont Volunteers in 1862-63; and was author of Vermont at Gettysburg; Vermont in the Civil War; Army life in Virginia, etc.ilitary officer; born in burlington, Vt., Dec. 10, 1826; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1847; served in the 12th Vermont Volunteers in 1862-63; and was author of Vermont at Gettysburg; Vermont in the Civil War; Army life in Virginia, etc.ilitary officer; born in burlington, Vt., Dec. 10, 1826; graduated at the University of Vermont in 1847; served in the 12th Vermont Volunteers in 1862-63; and was author of Vermont at Gettysburg; Vermont in the Civil War; Army life in Virginia, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Big Bethel, battle at. (search)
n men into their ranks. At Big and Little Bethel (two churches on the road between Yorktown and Hampton) they made fortified outposts. It was evident that Magruder was preparing to seize Newport News and Hampton, and confine Butler to Fort Monroe. The latter determined on a countervailing movement by an attack on these outposts. Gen. E. W. Pearce, of Massachusetts, was placed in command of an expedition for that purpose, composed of Duryee's Zouaves and the Troy troops at Camp Hamilton, Vermont and Massachusetts troops, some German New York troops, under Colonel Bendix, and two 6-pounders (field-pieces), under Lieutenant Greble, from Newport News. The latter had under him eleven regular artillerymen. The troops from the two points of departure were to be joined, in the night, near Little Bethel. The soldiers wore on their left arms a white rag or handkerchief, so that they might recognize each other in the dark. Their watchword was Boston. Lieutenant-Colonel Washburne led
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