Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Gravesend (United Kingdom) or search for Gravesend (United Kingdom) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 9 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brooklyn, (search)
in strengthening the old fortifications there, in expectation of an attack by the British. In the Civil War the citizens of Brooklyn contributed largely to the support of the Union cause in every way. The fair held here for the benefit of the United States Sanitary Commission yielded the sum of $402,943. Brooklyn was incorporated a village in April, 1816, and became a chartered city in 1834. Williamsburg and (Greenpoint were annexed to it in 1855; the towns of Flatbush, New Utrecht, and Gravesend, in 1894; and the town of Flatlands became a ward of the city in 1896. The bridge across the East River, connecting New York and Brooklyn, was designed by John A. Roebling (q. v.). It was begun in 1870 and finished in 1883. The steel cables by which it is suspended were made at Wilmington, Del.. and are supported on stone piers, 272 feet above high tide. The total length of the bridge is 5,989 feet. and the carriage-way is 135 feet above the water. The cost was $15,000,000, of which
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. It was drawn by Baxter, signed by all the delegates present, and sent to the governor, with a demand that he should give a categorical answer. In it the grievances of the people were stated under six heads. Stuyvesant met this severe document with his usual plu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson, Henry (search)
Hudson, Henry Navigator; born about the middle of the sixteenth century; was first employed by English merchants, in 1607, to search for a northeastern passage to India. He sailed from Gravesend on May 1, 1607, in a small vessel manned by only ten men and a boy—the latter his son. In lat. 80° N., on the eastern coast of Greenland, he was stopped by the ice-pack. He fought the ice-floes and storms for many weeks, and then returned to England in September, bearing only the fruit of the discovery of the island of Spitzbergen. Neither he nor his employers were disheartened, and late in April, 1608, he sailed again, expecting to make a passage between Spitzbergen and Nova Zembla. Again he was compelled by the ice to turn back. His employers were now discouraged, and Hudson went over to Holland and offered his services to the Dutch East India Company, and they were accepted. On April 6, 1609, he sailed from Amsterdam in the Half Moon, a stanch vessel of 90 tons, and steered for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pocahontas. (search)
privy council if the husband had not committed treason! Pocahontas remained in England about a year; and when, with her husband and son, she was about to return to Virginia, with her father's chief councillor, she was seized with small-pox at Gravesend, and died in June, 1617. Her remains lie within the parish church-yard at Gravesend. Her son, Thomas Rolfe, afterwards became a distinguished man in Virginia, and his descendants are found among the most honorable citizens of that commonwealtrivy council if the husband had not committed treason! Pocahontas remained in England about a year; and when, with her husband and son, she was about to return to Virginia, with her father's chief councillor, she was seized with small-pox at Gravesend, and died in June, 1617. Her remains lie within the parish church-yard at Gravesend. Her son, Thomas Rolfe, afterwards became a distinguished man in Virginia, and his descendants are found among the most honorable citizens of that commonwealth.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
mes Wilson, and Edward Rutledge; Richard Peters elected secretary June 12, 1776 American forces under General Sullivan retire from Canada to Crown Point, N. Y. June 18, 1776 Unsuccessful attack on Fort Moultrie by British fleet under Sir Peter Parker June 28, 1776 Declaration of Independence adopted by Congress July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence read to the army in New York by order of General Washington July 9, 1776 British General Lord Howe lands 10,000 men and forty guns near Gravesend, L. I. Aug. 22, 1776 Battle of Long Island Aug. 27, 1776 Washington withdraws his forces from Long Island to the city of New York.Aug. 29-30, 1776 Congress resolves that all Continental commissions in which heretofore the words United colonies have been used, bear hereafter the words United States Sept. 9, 1776 Americans evacuate New York CitySept. 14, 1776 British repulsed at Harlem HeightsSept. 16, 1776 Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and Arthur Lee appointed ambassadors to the Cou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steam navigation. (search)
herlands line established, 1872; Red Star line1873 Steamship Faraday, 5,000 tons, 360 feet long, 52 feet wide, and 36 feet deep, launched at NewcastleFeb. 17, 1874 First export of live cattle by steamer, 373 head, shipped from United States to England in the steamship EuropeanJuly, 1874 Dead-meat trade between United States and England by refrigeration commences on White Star liners Celtic and Britannic1874 Bessemer saloon steamer launched at Hull, Sept. 24, 1874, makes first voyage to GravesendMarch 5, 1875 Thingvalla line established1879 Anthracite, a steamer 84 feet long, planned by Loftus Perkins, of England, with very high-pressure engines, crosses the Atlantic, 3,316 miles, in 22 1/2 days, consuming only twenty-five tons of coal1880 Cunard steamer Etruria arrives at Quarantine, port of New York, one hour before the McKinley bill goes into effect, and Captain Haines reaches the custom-house barely a minute before midnight, saving thousands of dollars in increased dutie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
91, with teaching doctrines which conflict irreconcilably with, and are contrary to, the cardinal doctrines taught in the Holy Scriptures, in an address at the Union Theological Seminary in New York, Jan. 20, 1891: case dismissed, Nov. 4; prosecuting committee appeal to the general assembly. Nov. 13; judgment reversed and case remanded to the presbytery of New York for new trial, May 30, 1892; Professor Briggs acquitted after a trial of nineteen days......Dec. 30, 1892 John Y. McKane, Gravesend, L. I., for election frauds; convicted and sentenced to Sing Sing for six years......Feb. 19, 1894 Miss Madeline V. Pollard, for breach of promise, against Representative W. C. P. Breckinridge, of Kentucky; damages, $50,000; trial begun March 8, 1894, at Washington, D. C.; verdict of $15,000 for Miss Pollard, Saturday......April 14, 1894 Patrick Eugene Prendergast, for the murder of Carter Harrison, mayor of Chicago, Oct. 28, 1893; plea of defence, insanity; jury find him sane and he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
her granddaughter, eight years old, captured......1643 Throgmorton's settlement attacked and destroyed......1643 Gravesend, Long Island, attacked, but Indians repulsed......1643 Father Jogues escapes from the Indians at Fort Orange; is brothree representatives; Breuckelen, three; Flushing, two; Newtown, two; Hempstead, two; Flatlands, three; Flatbush, two; Gravesend, two; four Dutch and four English towns sent ten Dutch and nine English delegates......Dec. 10, 1653 Governor dissolto control Lake Champlain; manned by about 400 men......Aug. 22, 1776 Lord Howe lands 10,000 men and forty guns near Gravesend, L. I.......Aug. 22, 1776 Americans under General Sullivan defeated by General Howe, and Generals Sullivan and Sterl estate in New York......Jan. 16, 1894 [This decision affected $25,000,000 worth of property.] John Y. McKane, of Gravesend, L. I., found guilty of election frauds and intimidation, and sentenced at Brooklyn to six years in Sing Sing prison...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
s, daughter of Powhatan, on his vessel and takes her to Jamestown......1612 Marriage of Pocahontas to John Rolfe by the Rev. Alexander Whitaker at Jamestown......April 5, 1613 First establishment of fixed property in the soil; the company granting fifty acres to every freeman in fee-simple......1615 Sir Thomas Dale embarks with John Rolfe and his wife Pocahontas, reaching Plymouth......June 12, 1616 [Pocahontas soon after presented at the Court of James.] Pocahontas dies at Gravesend, Kent, when about to embark for Virginia, aged twenty-two, leaving one child......March 21, 1617 Capt. Samuel Argall returns to Virginia as deputy-governor with 100 settlers, and John Rolfe as secretary......May 15, 1617 First seal (colonial) of Virginia......1617 Lord Delaware embarks in the Neptune with 200 settlers and supplies; he dies on the passage......April 18, 1618 Powhatan dies......1618 Deputy-Governor Argall, convicted of malfeasance and oppressive exaction, esca