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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 32 6 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 31 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 24 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 17 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 14 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Lexington, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
duty, and said that they were quite as strict as, and ten times more polite than, regular soldiers. He replied, laughing, that a sentry, after refusing you leave to enter a camp, might very likely, if properly asked, show you another way in, by which you might avoid meeting a sentry at all. I saw General Pendleton and General Pickett today. Pendleton is Chief of Artillery to the army, and was a West-Pointer; but in more peaceable times he fills the post of Episcopal clergyman in Lexington, Virginia. Unlike General Polk, he unites the military and clerical professions together, and continues to preach whenever he gets a chance. On these occasions he wears a surplice over his uniform. General Pickett commands one of the divisions in Longstreet's corps. McLaws, Hood, and Pickett, are the three divisional com-manders or major-generals in Longstreet's corps d'armee. He wears his hair in long ringlets, and is altogether rather a desperate looking character. He is the officer