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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 277 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 35 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 31 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 26 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) or search for Brashear City (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 35: the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
ur vessel, plying between Indianola, in Texas, and Brashear, in Louisiana, skirts two of the rich Gulf States,ver, on the eastern bank of which lies the port of Brashear: a place created out of chaos, by the necessity whleans in little more than twenty-four hours. Is Brashear land or water? Slush and mud, gutter and pool, basin and drain, all meet in Brashear; a dismal swamp and fever-den, enclosed on every side with jungle, in whicom every branch. Observe this weed, a resident in Brashear says to me, when showing us the lions of his hamlsaid to like sleeping on this dried fever-moss. Brashear is a colony of Negroes, and a stronghold of the Blhe boats and trains, no White inhabitants dwell in Brashear. Every doorway shows a Negro, every gutter a duskMandingo fathers. Glancing through the lanes of Brashear, you perceive that, unlike Texas, Louisiana is a chreepence each; though oranges are so plentiful at Brashear, that if he fails to sell them in the cars, he wil