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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

e masterly sermon in Brooklyn, Dr. Van Dyck alluded eloquently to the same possibility. A movement is now openly on foot in that city, at the head of which is Col. Kerrigan, a member elect of Congress, to raise a force of ten thousand men for the purpose of defending New York against the Black Republican tyranny, spoliation and plunder under which she has so long suffered. That city is essentially American, always has been, always will be, the Greeleys, Raymonds, Beechers & Co being all New England squatters, who have come there to make money, and a miserable minority at that. They are in New York, but not of it, and will not be permitted to influence her policy. When she rises in her strength, she will shake them off as the lion shakes the dew drop from his mane. Will "Old Abe" coerce New York! Instead of talking about coercing States to the fulfillment of national engagements, the Northwest would better fulfill its private engagements, pay its honest debts, repeal its own null
the extension is imperiously demanded by the exigencies of travel and trade, which will not permit stoppages and changes when they can be avoided. A shrewd New England man said this morning that all Charleston has to do is to declare itself a free port; the Yankees will do the rest. Uncle Sam may impose as many embargoes on t Federal city, bringing, it is supposed, a compromise of some kind with him. Mr. Douglas, it is said, will at an early day advocate the plan of cutting off New England. I doubt this. Moreover, it is quite plain that all New England combined is not so dangerous to the South as the Tribune newspaper, which this plan proposes tNew England combined is not so dangerous to the South as the Tribune newspaper, which this plan proposes to retain in the new Union. The feeling here is against South Carolina. She is sneered at and reviled by the majority of the people. But many are devoted to her cause, and I have heard from a man who mixes with the lower orders that secession is on the increase among them. At the Theatre we have a drama of the French Rev