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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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vres. They know and feel the necessity of those changes, and they will not be deluded by the appeals of those who, heretofore, have led them into nothing but error. They feel that a worse system of Government than that under which we live could hardly be devised, they know that they were induced by gogues to insist upon its principal fea Let us cut loose from the Yankee system for this Constitution is eminently Yankee all its parts and all its bearings. It is fit for the latitude of New England, and for no other latitude as far as we know. It is eminently sinful for a proud, high-spirited race of gentlemen slaveholders, like the people of Virginia. We proceed to indicate some of the most objectionable points. First, Universal Suffrage. This is the most formidable instrument that tyranny ever employed to enslave a free people. It was by methods analogous to it that Tiberius, the most crafty tyrant that ever existed, succeeded in crushing the better classes in Rome, and i
hat of a gentleman while in the Hospital. His insulting language to several ladies caused his dismissal from that institution on Thursday. Last evening he came to this office and caused a paragraph to be published to the effect that all persons desiring to forward letters to the United States could do so by leaving them at this office, and he would take them to Louisville and mail them. Now, we have made inquiry about "Schenck alias Skunk," and are satisfied he is an imposter. He is a New England Yankee, with all the impudence of a patent medicine vender. How he came here we have act Louis, and that he formerly published a "religious journal" there. Startling development — an abolition Clue in the City. From the New Orleans Crescent, of the 22d inst., we take the following: Yesterday morning, Lieut. Morel, of the Third District Police, upon information received, arrested a German named Frenzel, who lives on Charles street, in the Second District, charging him wi
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], Mr. Russell's letters to the London times. (search)
down South, and when the Confederates were at Munson's Hill one of their most forward skirmishes — an indefatigable fellow, always loading and firing — was a black man. There has been no great reinforcements received by this army lately, in consequence of the diversion of Ohio and Illinois and Indiana troops to the State of Kentucky and to the West, and the largest estimate of the forces in the field does not raise it much above the numbers given in one of my recent letters. It is in the New England States, and the emigration from them in the West, which have put forth their strength in the war for the Union, and the Puritan and Quaker element of the other States has been animated by a similar spirit. In the regiments in camp there are prayer meetings, and preaching, and revivals, and Young Men's Christian Associations; the Colonels give benediction, the Majors preach, the sergeants pray, and the battalions march, singing sternly-- "Old John Brown lies a mouldering in his grave