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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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emselves on human flesh, We see no difference between them and the two-legged animals who grow rich and pampered upon the heart's blood of their country. If the doctrine of transmigration of souls were true, We can easily imagine that speculators and extortioners pass after this life into the bodies of those animals which feed upon the carcases of fallen heroes. In a book of Judge Johnson, of South Carolina, a story is told, intended to illustrate the bargaining and avaricious traits of New England money-lovers, which, with some modifications, We may apply with equal justice to our own extortioners and speculators. Henry Trevor, the hero of the book in question, had signed a bond with the Devil, some thirty years before, bartering away his soul for a certain period of uninterrupted pleasure and prosperity. At the appointed hour, the Devil appears, but, upon his urgent entreaties, gives him a respite of four days, and even makes him this liberal proposition: "Provided that you will