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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 17: Roanoke Island.-Mr. Davis's inauguration. (search)
Chapter 17: Roanoke Island.-Mr. Davis's inauguration. The year 1862 was destined to be a noted one in the annals of the country, and the military campaigns in the Confederate States opened early, to end only with the expiration of the year. Early in the year, Mr. Walker having resigned his portfolio, a general reorganization of the cabinet was arranged, and, on March 17th, the Senate made the following confirmations : Secretary of StateJ. P. Benjamin. TreasuryC. G. Memminger. SecralThomas H. Watts. The dissolution of his cabinet disquieted the President greatly, and about this time the organized opposition party began to be felt. The enemy also manifested unusual activity. Their first move was the capture of Roanoke Island, on the low coast-line of North Carolina, for it was an important outpost of the Confederates. Its possession by the enemy would give them access to the country from which Norfolk drew its supplies. On January 22, 1862, General Henry A.
Chapter 36: introduction to 1863. The year 1863 opened drearily for the President, but the Confederates generally seemed to have, for some unexplained cause, renewed hope of recognition by England and France, and with this they felt sure of a successful termination of the struggle. Mr. Davis was oppressed by the fall of Donelson, Nashville, Corinth, Roanoke Island, New Orleans, Yorktown, Norfolk, Fort Pillow, Island No.10, Memphis, General Bragg's defeat at Murfreesboro, the burning of the Virginia and the ram Mississippi, the sinking of the Arkansas, and other minor disasters. The victory at Fredericksburg was the one bright spot in all this dark picture. Complaints from the people of the subjugated States came in daily. Women were set adrift across our borders with their children, penniless and separated from all they held dear. Their property was confiscated, the newspapers were suppressed, and the presses sold under the Confiscation act. In Tennessee, county of