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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ational troops on the Pamunkey a sharp fight, 385. head quarters near the White House a trick to save that building, 386. preparations to attack Norfolk vigilef, with the advance portion of his force, did not reach the vicinity of the White House, The White House, as it was called, was the property of Mary Custis Lee, White House, as it was called, was the property of Mary Custis Lee, a great-granddaughter of Mrs. Washington, daughter of George W. P. Custis, the adopted son of Washington, and wife of the Confederate Commander, Robert E. Lee. It stood on or near the site of the dwelling known as The White House, in which the widow Custis lived, and where the nuptial ceremonies of her marriage with Colonel Geoy, and about eighteen miles from Richmond, until the 16th. He arrived at Tunstall's Station, on the Richmond and York River railway, on the 18th, and on the 22d he m from Richmond. His advanced light troops had reached Bottom's The modern White House. bridge, on the Chickahominy, at the crossing of the New Kent road, two d
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
e of communication with its supplies at the White House, on the Pamunkey. Had that base of supplieown that McCall's forces had arrived at the White House, a few days later, June 12, 13. they expecn Royall, and sweeping around almost to the White House, by Tunstall's Station, seized and burned fTunstall's Station, seized and burned fourteen wagons and. two schooners laden with forage at Garlick's Landing, above the White House, on h the removal of the public property at the White House, McClellan found it necessary to hold the Ft off from Porter's force, proceeded to the White House, and thence to Yorktown, and rejoined the attle to preserve his communication with the White House; or else, if it was his intention to relinq and cut McClellan's communication with the White House. They found that supply-station abandoned,of war removed, and the remainder, with the White House itself, in flames. An order had been sent that morning to the commander at the White House to apply the torch to every thing there not alre[7 more...]