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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 10 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 1 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 8 2 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 5 5 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Chester, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chester, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chester (search)
Chester The first town settled in Pennsylvania. The Delaware River Iron Shipbuilding and Engine Works established here in 1872 by John Roach. Here the City of Pekin and City of Tokio were built for the Pacific mail service.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
landed in Brunswick county with about 900 men. Lord Cornwallis (from an English print). and proceeded to his assigned work. In this ignoble expedition—his first in America—he lost two men killed and one taken prisoner. Clinton, in a proclamation (May 5), invited the people to appease the vengeance of an incensed nation by submission, and offered pardon to all, excepting General Howe and Cornelius Harnett. Howe sent Cornwallis in November, 1777, with a strong body of troops, by way of Chester, to Billingsport to clear the New Jersey banks of the Delaware. Washington immediately sent General Greene with a division across the river to oppose the movement. Cornwallis was reinforced by five British battalions front New York, while expected reinforcements from the northern army were still delayed through the bad conduct of General Gates. The consequence was the forced abandonment of Fort Mercer, at Red Bank, and the levelling of its ramparts by the British troops. The leaders of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crosby, Peirce (search)
Crosby, Peirce Naval officer; born near Chester, Pa., Jan. 16, 1823; entered the navy as midshipman in 1844; was engaged in the war with Mexico; and was very active as commander on the coast of North Carolina during portions of the Civil War. He was specially brave and skilful in the capture of the forts at Cape Hatteras, at the passage of the forts on the lower Mississippi in the spring of 1862, and at Vicksburg in June and July the same year. He was in command of the Metacomet during the operations which led to the capture of Mobile in 1865. In 1882 he was promoted to rearadmiral, and in the following year was retired. He died near Washington, D. C., June 15, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Felton, Cornelius Conway 1807- (search)
Felton, Cornelius Conway 1807- Educator; born in West Newbury, Mass., Nov. 6, 1807; graduated at Harvard in 1827; appointed Latin tutor there in 1829, and Professor of Greek Literature in 1839; and was president of Harvard from 1860 till his death in Chester, Pa., Feb. 26, 1862. He is the author of Life of William Eaton in Sparks's American biographies, and many books on general literature.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Futhey, John Smith 1820- (search)
Futhey, John Smith 1820- Historian; born in Chester county, Pa., Sept. 3, 1820; admitted to the bar in 1843, and was district attorney for five years. In 1879 he became presiding judge of the district. He is the author of many historical works, including Historical collections of Chester county; Historical address on the one hundredth anniversary of the Paoli massacre; History of Chester county, etc. Futhey, John Smith 1820- Historian; born in Chester county, Pa., Sept. 3, 1820; admitted to the bar in 1843, and was district attorney for five years. In 1879 he became presiding judge of the district. He is the author of many historical works, including Historical collections of Chester county; Historical address on the one hundredth anniversary of the Paoli massacre; History of Chester county, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 Twentieth President of the United States; born in Orange, Cuyahoga co., O., Nov. 19, 1831. Left an orphan, his childhood and youth were spent alternately in school and in labor for his support. He drove horses on the Ohio canal; learned the carpenter's trade; worked at it during school vacations; entered the Geauga Academy, at Chester, O., in 1850, and, at the end of four years, had fitted himself for junior in college. He entered Williams College, Mass., that year; graduated in 1856; and then, till 1861, was first an instructor in Hiram College, and afterwards its president; gave his first vote for the Republican candidates, and took part in the canvass as a promising orator; studied law; was a member of the Ohio State Senate in 1859, and often preached to congregations of the Disciples' Church, of which he was a member. A firm supporter of the government, Garfield entered the military service in its defence, and in eastern Kentucky and elsewh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Germantown, battle of. (search)
try, but they soon smote the British right with force. The failure of the other troops to co-operate with them by turning the British left caused Greene to fail, and the golden opportunity to strike a crushing blow had passed. In the fog that still prevailed, parties of Americans attacked each other on the field; and it was afterwards ascertained that, while the assault on Chew's house was in progress, the whole British army were preparing to fly across the Schuylkill, and rendezvous at Chester. At that moment of panic General Grey observed that his flanks were secure, and Knyphausen marched with his whole force to assist the beleaguered garrison and the contending regiments in the village. Then a short and severe battle occurred in the heart of Germantown. The Americans could not discern the number of their assailants in the confusing mist, when suddenly the cry of a trooper, We are surrounded! produced a panic, and the patriots retreated in great confusion. The struggle las
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
ged him to stop and have his wound bandaged: he was even very near being taken. Fugitives, cannon, and baggage now crowded without order into the road leading to Chester. The general employed the remaining daylight in checking the enemy: some regiments behaved extremely well, but the disorder was complete. During that time the ford of Chad was forced, the cannon taken, and the Chester road became the common retreat of the whole army. In the midst of that dreadful confusion, and during the darkness of the night, it was impossible to recover; but at Chester, 12 miles from the field of battle, they met with a bridge which it was necessary to cross. M. de LChester, 12 miles from the field of battle, they met with a bridge which it was necessary to cross. M. de Lafayette occupied himself in arresting the fugitives. Some degree of order was re-established; the generals and the commander-in-chief arrived; and he had leisure to have his wound dressed. It was thus, at 26 miles from Philadelphia, that the fate of that town was decided (11th September, 1777). The inhabitants had heard every
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nixon, Lewis 1861- (search)
United States Naval Academy in 1882, at the head of his class; was sent by the government to the Royal Naval College, at Greenwich, England, where lie took a special course in engineering and ordnance; and afterwards made tours throughout Great Britain and on the Continent to study the workings of the great European docks, dock-yards, arsenals, and steel and armor plants. In 1884 he was appointed assistant naval constructor, and in the following year was assigned to Roach's ship-yard in Chester, Pa., where the Chicago, Boston, Atlanta, and Dolphin were in course of construction. Later he served on the staffs of Chief Constructors Wilson and Hichborn, and also as superintending constructor at Cramp's shipyard, Philadelphia. In 1890 he drew the plans for the battle-ships of the Oregon and Indiana class. In 1891 he resigned from the navy to become superintending constructor for the Cramp ship-building company, and in 1894 he resigned this post and leased the Crescent Ship-yard, at El
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Paoli Tavern. (search)
oached stealthily, murdering the pickets near the highway. Warned by this, Wayne immediately paraded his men, but, unfortunately, in the light of his campfires. Towards midnight Grey's force, in two divisions, crept up a ravine, and at 1 A. M. (Sept. 21) leaped from the gloom like tigers from a jungle, and began the work of death at different points. The patriots, not knowing at what point was the chief attack, fired a few volleys, and, breaking into fragments, fled in confusion towards Chester. The British and Hessians killed 150 Americans, some of them in cold blood, after they had surrendered and begged for quarter. A Hessian sergeant afterwards said: We killed 300 of the rebels with the bayonet. I stuck them myself like so many pigs, one after another, until the blood ran out of the touch-hole of my musket. This event has been properly spoken of as a massacre. The dead were buried on the site of the encampment. The spot is enclosed by a wall, and a monument of marble wit
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