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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 230 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 152 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 48 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 2 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 30 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death.. You can also browse the collection for Venice (Italy) or search for Venice (Italy) in all documents.

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Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 21: the conscription and its consequences. (search)
lling to accept that arbitration to which they had submitted their cause, and ready to take the hand of fellowship if offered, they still preferred to suffer with the bright memories of their past, rather than to efface them by signing their own degradation. They were conquered and bound in the flesh, but there was enough of manhood left in the spirit to say- Though ye conquer us, men of the North, know ye not What fierce, sullen hatred lurks under the scar? How loyal to Hapsburg is Venice, I wot! How dearly the Pole loves his father --the Czar! No more singular sight was presented by all the war than the conscript depot at Richmond. The men from the camps of instruction in the several states-after a short sojourn to learn the simplest routine of the camp, and often thoroughly untaught in the manual even — were sent here to be in greater readiness when wanted. Such officers as could be spared were put in charge of them, and the cadets of the Virginia Military Institu
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 31: the Chinese-Wall blockade, abroad and at home. (search)
mania for exchanging paper money for something that could be enjoyed, grew apace as the war progressed. Fancy articles for dress, table luxuries and frippery of all sorts came now into great demand. Their importation increased to such bulk as, at last, to exclude the more necessary parts of most cargoes; and not less to threaten complete demoralization of such minority as made any money. It may seem a grim joke;--the starving, tattered-moribund Confederacy passing sumptuary laws, as had Venice in her recklessness of riches! But, in 1864, a law was necessitated against importation of all articles, not of utility; forbidden luxuries being named per schedule. That its constant evasion --if not its open defiance — was very simple, may be understood; for the blockade firms had now become a power coequal with Government, and exceptions were listed, sufficient to become the rule. And so the leeches waxed fat and flourished on the very lifeblood of the cause, that represented to the
s entirely ignored; no sort of grace was shown to its possessor, unless he took the oath; and many men, caught in Richmond at this time and far from home, were reduced to distress and almost starvation by the refusal of transportation. All this the southern people bore with patience. They submitted to all things but two: they would not take the oath and they would not mix socially with their conquerors. In that respect the line was as rigorously drawn in Richmond, at that time, as ever Venice drew it against the Austrian. Not that any attempt was omitted by the Federals to overcome what they called this prejudice. There was music in Capitol Square, by the best bands of the army, and the ladies were specially invited by the public prints. Not one went; and the officers listened to their own music in company with numbers of lusty black emancipated, who fully felt themselves women and sisters. Next it was given out that the negroes would not be admitted; but then the officers li