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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 4 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War.. You can also browse the collection for Thackeray or search for Thackeray in all documents.

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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Facetiae of the camp: souvenirs of a C. S. Officer. (search)
of the hospitable mansion in which I tarried; the family declared the incident exactly true; and the hero of the affair, the black baby, namely, is still living. Lastly, I know the woman, she is very worthless, but all are. Viii. There was down in Stafford, during the war, a youthful negro of six or eight years of age, who excited the admiration of everybody by his passionate devotion to the Confederacy, and the big words which he used. In fact, his vocabulary was made up of what Mr. Thackeray calls the longest and handsomest words in the dictionary. Still he could be terse, pointed, epigrammatic, and hard-cutting in speech. Of these statements two illustrations are given. 1. When an artillery fight took place near the mansion which had the honour of sheltering him, the young African was observed to pause, assume an attitude of extreme attention, remove his hat, scratch his head, and listen. Then turning to his master, he said with dignity, Hear that artillery, sir. Thos