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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 66 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 64 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 54 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 45 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 42 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 35 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 32 2 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
fficers as Sumner, Sedgwick, McClellan, Emory, Thomas, Stoneman, Stanley, Carr, etc., who served wither field officer who accompanied it, Lee and Thomas being on court-martial detail. The regiment will go from here to Fort Mason and pick up Major Thomas General George H. Thomas. and take him General George H. Thomas. and take him on with me, and thus have him as a traveling companion all the way, which will be a great comfort to sash, etc. They are, however, all dry now. Major Thomas traveled with me from Fort Mason. We are i he is all I have, and neither the major [George H. Thomas] nor I can stand these long and interestiants: Indianola, Texas, March 28, 1857. Major Thomas, anticipating a long sojourn, brought down Mrs. Thomas with him, who told me last evening of her troubles in relation to her womenkind. She burt, I am sorry to say. Colonel Bainbridge, Major Thomas, Major Van Horn, Major Paul, Captain King, tents by the side of mine for the Major and Mrs. Thomas, for she has accompanied him again, and the[2 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
sas, while making a real attack upon Joe Johnston in the Valley of Virginia. With the defeat of Johnston the victorious army could march on Beauregard at Manassas, re-enforced by the troops around the Federal capital. Soldiers of high reputation and great merit were ordered to report to Patterson. Fitz John Porter was his adjutant general, Amos Beckwith commissary of subsistence, Crosman quartermaster, Sampson topographical engineer, Newton engineer; while such men as A. E. Burnside, George H. Thomas, Miles, Abercrombie, Cadwalader, Stone, and Negley commanded troops; and then, the laws being silent in the midst of arms, Senator John Sherman, of Ohio, was his aid-de-camp. From Patterson's position two routes led to the Valley of Virginia, one via Frederick, Md., across the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, the other by Hagerstown, Md., crossing at Williamsport and thence to Martinsburg. Patterson wisely selected the latter route, because it was a flank movement on his enemy at Harper's
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
campaign, however, had a marked effect upon his future. General Scott telegraphed: The General in Chief, the Cabinet, the President, are charmed with your activity and valor. We do not doubt that you will in due time sweep the rebels from western Virginia, but we do not mean to precipitate you, as you are fast enough. After McDowell's defeat at Manassas, McClellan was selected to command the defenses at Washington, and the day after that battle, while at Beverly, was informed by Adjutant-General Thomas, at Washington, that his presence there without delay was necessary. General William S. Rosecrans succeeded him. On July 28th McClellan assumed command of the Department of Northeastern Virginia and of Washington. Being necessary to select another commanding officer for the Southern troops in Northwest Virginia, General Lee designated Brigadier-General Loring, who had been a distinguished officer in the United States service, to be Garnett's successor. Loring left Richmond J
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
or a portion of the line, fortified position. Why Reynolds was not supported by Smith's Sixth Corps of twenty-four thousand men, which was a short distance behind him, is one of the mysteries of war. Franklin would still have had fourteen thousand men-namely, two divisions of the Third Corps and one of the Ninth --exclusive of thirty-five hundred cavalry, under the gallant Bayard, as a reserve. The Federal advance marched to destruction. Meade broke through a gap in Jackson's line between Thomas's and Archer's brigade, but fresh troops came up under Taliaferro and Early, amid cries of Here comes old Jubal! Let Jubal straighten that fence! and it was securely rebuilt. The Union troops were broken and driven back with great slaughter. Meade lost in killed, wounded, and missing, 1,853, and Gibbon 1,266 men, in a short, fierce, furious and useless combat. Meade told Franklin he found it quite hot, taking off his slouch hat and showing two bullet holes between which and the top o
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
rties everywhere cut away the abatis and chevaux-de-frise, and through the opening the blue masses poured into the works. There were high parapets and high relief and deep ditches; but the troops had been drawn away to the Southern right, and except here and there, notably at Fort Gregg, it was only a matter of physical agility to climb over them. Only small garrisons were in the forts, and very few men in the connecting lines. Four small brigades, Wilcox's division, Hill's corpsviz., Thomas's, Lane's, Davis's, and McCombs's-held the entire line in the front of the armies of Ord and Wright, while Gordon, with a few thousand troops, held in front of Parke's Ninth Corps. Lee's troops were forced back to an inner line whose flanks rested on the river above and below Petersburg, and there resisted all further attempts to break through them. Before 10 A. M., Lee knew he could only hope to cling to his trenches until night, and that the longer defense of Richmond and Petersburg was
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
, 159. Clay, Henry, mentioned, 32. Clitz, General, Henry, 172. Cobb, General Thomas R., mentioned, 231; killed at Fredericksburg, 233. Cocke, Mrs. Elizabethon's First Corps, 421, 422. Devil's Den, Gettysburg, 274, 285. Devin, General Thomas C., 373. Dinwiddie Court House, 376. Disaster at Five Forks, 376. DiVirginia, 99. Jackson, Andrew, mentioned, 17; toast to, 222. Jackson, General Thomas J., notice of, 47; mentioned, 133, 135, 137, 140, 141, 144, 153, 155, 157, 10, 32. Jenkins's cavalry brigade, 263, 265; at Gettysburg, 297. Jesup, General Thomas S., 134. Johnson, General, Bushrod, mentioned, 347. Johnson, General,hary, 32, 33, 54. Terry, General, 24. Texan troops in the Wilderness, 331. Thomas, General George H., notice of, 47; mentioned, 61, 62, 58, 60, 103. Thomas, GThomas, G. H., Mrs., mentioned, 67,69. Thomas, General, Lorenzo, 115. Thoroughfare Gap, 189, 190, 192, 193. Todd's Tavern, Va., 244. Toombs, General, Robert, 213, 214.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, General Halleck in command-commanding the district of Cairo-movement on Fort Henry- capture of Fort Henry (search)
time with a force of 6,000 men was sent out into west Kentucky, threatening Columbus with one column and the Tennessee River with another. I went with McClernand's command. The weather was very bad; snow and rain fell; the roads, never good in that section, were intolerable. We were out more than a week splashing through the mud, snow and rain, the men suffering very much. The object of the expedition was accomplished. The enemy did not send reinforcements to Bowling Green, and General George H. Thomas fought and won the battle of Mill Springs before we returned. As a result of this expedition General Smith reported that he thought it practicable to capture Fort Heiman. This fort stood on high ground, completely commanding Fort Henry on the opposite side of the river, and its possession by us, with the aid of our gunboats, would insure the capture of Fort Henry. This report of Smith's confirmed views I had previously held, that the true line of operations for us was up the T
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Promoted Major-General of Volunteers-Unoccupied territory-advance upon Nashville-situation of the troops-confederate retreat- relieved of the command-restored to the command-general Smith (search)
al troops occupied no territory south of the Ohio, except three small garrisons along its bank and a force thrown out from Louisville to confront that at Bowling Green. Johnston's strength was no doubt numerically inferior to that of the National troops; but this was compensated for by the advantage of being sole commander of all the Confederate forces at the West, and of operating in a country where his friends would take care of his rear without any detail of soldiers. But when General George H. Thomas moved upon the enemy at Mill Springs and totally routed him, inflicting a loss of some 300 killed and wounded, and forts Henry and Heiman fell into the hands of the National forces, with their armaments and about 100 prisoners, those losses seemed to dishearten the Confederate commander so much that he immediately commenced a retreat from Bowling Green on Nashville. He reached this latter place on the 14th of February, while Donelson was still besieged. Buell followed with a porti
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Struck by a bullet-precipitate retreat of the Confederates--intrenchments at Shiloh--General Buell-General Johnston--remarks on Shiloh (search)
n the South, this number probably excluded every man enlisted as musician or detailed as guard or nurse, and all commissioned officers-everybody who did not carry a musket or serve a cannon. With us everybody in the field receiving pay from the government is counted. Excluding the troops who fled, panic-stricken, before they had fired a shot, there was not a time during the 6th when we had more than 25,000 men in line. On the 7th Buell brought 20,000 more. Of his remaining two divisions, Thomas's did not reach the field during the engagement; Wood's arrived before firing had ceased, but not in time to be of much service. Our loss in the two days fight was 1,754 killed, 8,408 wounded and 2,885 missing. Of these, 2,103 were in the Army of the Ohio. Beauregard reported a total loss of 10,699, of whom 1,728 were killed, 8,012 wounded and 957 missing. This estimate must be incorrect. We buried, by actual count, more of the enemy's dead in front of the divisions of McClernand and
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Halleck Assumes Command in the Field-The Advance upon Corinth-Occupation of Corinth- The Army Separated (search)
d now three armies: the Army of the Ohio, Buell commanding; the Army of the Mississippi, Pope commanding; and the Army of the Tennessee [Grant]. His orders divided the combined force into the right wing, reserve, centre and left wing. Major-General George H. Thomas, who had been in Buell's army, was transferred with his division to the Army of the Tennessee and given command of the right wing, composed of all of that army except McClernand's and Lew. Wallace's divisions. McClernand was assignedy infantry. Sherman's division carried these two positions with some loss to himself, but with probably greater to the enemy, on the 28th of May [27th], and on that day the investment of Corinth was complete, or as complete as it was ever made. Thomas' right now rested west on the Mobile and Ohio railroad. Pope's left commanded the Memphis and Charleston railroad east of Corinth. Some days before I had suggested to the commanding general that I thought if he would move the Army of the Mis
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