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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
d Creek, military movements on, 214 S St. John's River, the, travel and sickness on, 19, 25 St. Joseph, Mo., allegations from persons in, concerning arming of disloyal persons in Missouri, 104, 105 St. Louis, Mo., S.'s residences, sojourns, and commands in, and visits to, 30, 50, 51, 53, 64, 84, 110, 424, 425, 427, 428; loyal and patriotic citizens, 30, 31; enlistment of loyal volunteers, 33, 34; defense of the arsenal, 33, 34; night drills, 34; secured to the Union side, 37; Jeff Thompson threatens communications with, 51; Union convention, 54; disloyalty in, 57; opposition to S. in, 58-61, 424, 427, 428; importance, 60; dismissal of militia regiments in, 85; factions, 85, 86; return of the radical delegation from Washington, 99; interview between Washburne and S. in, 107; Gen. Grant entertained in, 111; Halleck a, 359; Sherman removes his headquarters from Washington to, 406, 469; hospitalities of, 424, 427, 428; Sheridan removes to Chicago from, 425; headquarters of Dep
they stopped and talked for some time, representing themselves as Southern men. The rebels soon heard a bugle behind them, however, and, suspecting all was not right, made a charge upon our scouts, who killed three of them and captured their horses, the remaining two falling into the hands of the Federal advance. At Helena they engaged in buying cotton for the speculators, and in one of their excursions were captured by the guerrillas. Pretending to be rebels, they joined a portion of Jeff Thompson's gang, and, remaining with them eleven days, obtained much information concerning him. Having had enough of guerilla life, they planned an escape, in this wise. An old negro, of whom they knew, was just going into Helena with a load of cotton for sale. By him they sent word to General Steele of an arrangement which had been made to rob him on his return of the proceeds of the cotton. The message was carried and delivered faithfully, and on his way back the negro was robbed, as propo
y shortly afterward, in which the facts came to light. At the crossing of Whitewater Vandiver undertook to force things, but was hurled back so suddenly and effectually by Shelby that he kept at a respectful distance until Bloomfield was reached. There Marmaduke halted and remained in line of battle all day. At Chalk Bluffs he had to cross the St. Francis river, and there was no bridge. He, therefore, sent Maj. Robert Smith of his staff, Maj. Robert Lawrence of Shelby's staff, and Gen. Jeff Thompson who volunteered for the occasion, in advance with a hundred men to build a bridge, and halted at Bloomfield to fight the enemy and give the bridge-builders time. But Vandiver was cautious, and though skirmishing continued all day and the fighting sometimes became sharp, he did not make a general attack. Again Marmaduke halted, early in the afternoon, when he reached the hills that border the St. Francis at Chalk Bluffs, and again Vandiver skirmished with him, but did not attempt to f
through Lafayette county and Lexington, and did not consider himself safe until he reached Independence, in Jackson county. On the advance from Salt Fork, Gen. Jeff Thompson, with Shelby's brigade, made a detour to Sedalia to take in Col. John F. Philips and his command, who held the town. Thompson took the town, and Philips waThompson took the town, and Philips was so closely pressed that he left his pistols behind, which Thompson captured. All this time danger was gathering fast around the army. General Rosecrans had come on the railroad to Sedalia with a strong force, and was advancing on Price from the east. Another heavy force had been concentrated at Leavenworth under command of Thompson captured. All this time danger was gathering fast around the army. General Rosecrans had come on the railroad to Sedalia with a strong force, and was advancing on Price from the east. Another heavy force had been concentrated at Leavenworth under command of General Curtis, and was advancing to meet him from the west. These two forces were rapidly approaching, with Price between them. Price, however, did not quicken his leisurely gait or appear in the least disturbed. At the crossing of the Little Blue, a few miles below Independence, October 21st, Marmaduke had a stubborn fight wi
result would have been complete. But if Price had intended to make his way across the Tennessee, or to hold his own until Van Dorn could come up, and then make a simultaneous attack on Corinth, he was foiled. Since the close of the war, Colonel Thompson, late of the rebel army, has stated to General Ord, his brother-in-law, that the movement of Rosecrans on a single road, his strength and the condition of his force, and the fact that the Fulton road, south, was left open, were betrayed to Price, on the afternoon of the fight, by Dr. Burton, a rebel assistant surgeon of Claiborne's regiment. This doctor informed Colonel Thompson that he had secured the confidence of Rosecrans, and been employed by him as a scout and spy; had remained with him on the 19th, until he saw the route pursued by Rosecrans towards Iuka, and the condition of his column. He then left the national army, and hurried into town to give the information to Price. That general at once withdrew all his force from
attacking the enemy. Very respectfully, etc., Chauncey McKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General. St. Louis, November 2, 1861. To Brigadier-General Grant: Jeff Thompson is at Indian ford of the St. Francois river, twenty-five miles below Greenville, with about three thousand men. Colonel Carlin has started with force from Pilot Knob. Send a force from Cape Girardeau and Bird's Point to assist Carlin in driving Thompson into Arkansas. By order of Major-General Fremont. C. McKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters, District southeast Missouri, Cairo, November 3, 1861. Colonel R. J. Oglesby, commanding, etc.,< Bird's Point, Missouri: e you will strike for Sikeston, Mr. Cropper acting as guide. From there you will go in pursuit of a rebel force, understood to be three thousand strong, under Jeff Thompson, now at Indian ford, on the St. Francis river. An expedition has already left Ironton, Missouri, to attack this force. Should they learn that they have lef
ce at dark, and pushed on himself with Ruger's troops to open communication with Stanley. The head of the main column followed close behind. Schofield struck the enemy's cavalry at dark, about three miles south of Spring Hill, brushing them away without difficulty, and reaching Spring Hill at seven. Here he found Stanley still in possession, but the rebel army bivouacking within eight hundred yards of the road. Posting one brigade to hold the road, he pushed on with Ruger's division to Thompson's station, three miles beyond. At this point the camp fires of the rebel cavalry were still burning, but the enemy had disappeared, and the cross-roads were secured without difficulty. The withdrawal of the force at Columbia was now safely effected, and Spring Hill was passed without molestation in the night, the troops moving within gun-shot of the enemy. Before daylight, the entire national column had passed, and at an early hour on the 30th, Schofield's command was in position at Fran
except in the case of Johnston's army to General Sherman. ordnance office, War Department, December 30, 1880. Extract from a memorandum copy of a consolidated Report of exchanged and paroled prisoners of War during the rebellion, made by the commissary General of prisoners to the Secretary of War, December 6, 1865. Paroled armies, rebel. Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General R. E. Lee 27,805 Army of Tennessee, and others, commanded by General J E Johnston31,243 General Jeff Thompson's Army of Missouri7,978 Miscellaneous Paroles, Department of Virginia 9,072 Paroled at Cumberland, Maryland, and other stations9,377 Paroled by General McCook, in Alabama and Florida6,428 Army of the Department of Alabama, Lieutenant-General R. Taylor42,293 Army of the Trans-Mississippi Department, General E. K. Smith17,686 Paroled in the Department of Washington3,390 Paroled in Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas13,922 Surrendered at Nashville and Ch
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
lunteers, 70, 73, 82. Terry, Judge D. S., 386 Texas, Fourth and Fifth regiments, 381. Tharin, Private, 186. Thayer. Hon. Eli, 363. Thomas, Gen., Geo, H., 443. Thomas, Gen Lorenzo, 450. Thompson, 7 Thompson, Hon., Jacob, 274. Thompson, Gen., Jeff., 70. Thompson, Maj. James W., 214. Thornwell, Rev. Dr., Jas. H., 13. Todd, Capt , 379. Toombs, Hon., Robert, 272, 322, 393. Torpedo System of the South, 282. Totopotomoy Creek, Incidents of skirmish at, 47. Townsend, Gen. E. Thompson, Maj. James W., 214. Thornwell, Rev. Dr., Jas. H., 13. Todd, Capt , 379. Toombs, Hon., Robert, 272, 322, 393. Torpedo System of the South, 282. Totopotomoy Creek, Incidents of skirmish at, 47. Townsend, Gen. E. D., 81. Trabue, Col., 310. Trask, Capt., 71. Tredegar Iron Works, 288. Trenches before Petersburg, 395. Trenholm Hon G. A, 273. Trevillian's Station. Battle of, 26. Trim. Lt . 404. Troops, Disparity in number of between North and South, 437. Troup, Capt., 394. Trudeau. Gen., 96, 97 Turnbull, Col. Geo., 8, II. Turney. Hon. Peter, Address of, 319. Tutwiler, Sergeant H. A., 92. University of Virginia. Efforts of for materials for a history of the late war, 56. Urquhar
ce at dark, and pushed on himself with Ruger's troops to open communication with Stanley. The head of the main column followed close behind. Schofield struck the enemy's cavalry at dark, about three miles south of Spring Hill, brushing them away without difficulty, and reaching Spring Hill at seven. Here he found Stanley still in possession, but the rebel army bivouacking within eight hundred yards of the road. Posting one brigade to hold the road, he pushed on with Ruger's division to Thompson's station, three miles beyond. At this point the camp fires of the rebel cavalry were still burning, but the enemy had disappeared, and the cross-roads were secured without difficulty. The withdrawal of the force at Columbia was now safely effected, and Spring Hill was passed without molestation in the night, the troops moving within gun-shot of the enemy. Before daylight, the entire national column had passed, and at an early hour on the 30th, Schofield's command was in position at Fran
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