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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 21 5 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 15 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Edward Thornton or search for Edward Thornton in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
rz, Morrill of Vermont. General Sickles, General Webb, W. M. Evarts, Edmund Quincy, Agassiz. Ex-President Roberts of Liberia, Berthemy the French minister, Sir Edward Thornton the English minister, Gerolt the Prussian minister, and Blacque Bey the Turkish minister. Geore William Curtis, while at Washington as chairman of the Civister, who is in California, has all her small means in five-twenties, but I have not counselled any change. I fear that this is a very unsatisfactory letter. Mr. Thornton Sir Edward Thornton, British minister. has arrived. We have exchanged calls without meeting. I hear him called amiable and interesting. I cannot cease to dSir Edward Thornton, British minister. has arrived. We have exchanged calls without meeting. I hear him called amiable and interesting. I cannot cease to deplore the blow dealt at arbitration by the English government, through whose representative it was recognized at the Congress of Paris as the proper mode of deciding questions between nations. Sumner made an elaborate speech in favor of a return to specie payments, in which he reprobated various schemes for tampering with the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 54: President Grant's cabinet.—A. T. Stewart's disability.—Mr. Fish, Secretary of State.—Motley, minister to England.—the Alabama claims.—the Johnson-Clarendon convention.— the senator's speech: its reception in this country and in England.—the British proclamation of belligerency.— national claims.—instructions to Motley.—consultations with Fish.—political address in the autumn.— lecture on caste.—1869. (search)
vity of the American case, and were anxious for a complete settlement. From that date the foreign office, through Sir Edward Thornton, minister at Washington, and Sir John Rose, an unofficial envoy, kept plying our government to learn our terms of island would become a desert. I gave them no encouragement. In the evening I had a prolonged talk with Fish, whom Thornton had visited that day. Fish said to him that our claims were too large to be settled pecuniarily, and sounded him about C attention of the authorities. The British Cabinet was uneasy under the suspension of negotiations, and through Sir Edward Thornton sounded our government as to what terms of settlement would be satisfactory to it. The following letter, given in preceding.— Washington, Nov. 6, 1869. My dear Sumner,—On two or three occasions within the last few months Mr. Thornton has, in conversation, casually expressed the wish that I would intimate to him the views of this government as to the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
he British commissioners were Earl de Grey (afterwards Marquis of Ripon), Sir Stafford Northcote (afterwards Lord Iddlesleigh), Professor Mountague Bernard, Sir Edward Thornton, and Sir John Macdonald. Just then came the dismissal from the post he had long held of the statesman who had studied the questions at issue more than any and the hitter from Thomas Baring. The senator and Professor Bernard were already in sympathy by common studies in international law. Sumner was invited by Sir Edward Thornton to meet them at his table without other guests. Once he dined with the commissioners, and several times he breakfasted with Earl de Grey. Late in April the senator gave all the members, including Lord Tenterden their secretary, a dinner, when were also present Lady Thornton and Lady Macdonald, Cushing, Thurman, and Hunter, the assistant secretary of state. The next day he gave a quiet dinner to the commissioners only, which allowed a free conference on the pending business. Two w