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will forward the communication to Her Majesty's Government, and will immediately make arrangements to place the four gentlemen again under the protection of the British flag. Beside these documents on the Trent case, there is a despatch from M. Thouvenel, the French Minister for Foreign Affairs, to M. Mercier, the Minister of the Emperor at Washington, in which Thouvenel pronounces the conduct of the American cruiser unjustifiable, but hopes for a pacific solution of the difficulty. To this MThouvenel pronounces the conduct of the American cruiser unjustifiable, but hopes for a pacific solution of the difficulty. To this Mr. Seward responds in a note to M. Mercier, in which he corrects an error of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, refers him to his correspondence with the British Government, and exchanges assurances of friendship. The settlement of the Trent difficulty affords much gratification, and there is a general expressed acquiescence in the course of the Government, while the despatches of Secretary Seward are viewed in the light of the highest statesmanlike ability.
Song, P. 74 Thomas, Gen., D. 108 Thomas, John L., D. 69 Thomas, —, Judge, of Boston, D. 49 Thomasson, H. F., D. 72 Thompson, George W., Judge, D. 82; proclamation, at Wheeling, Va., May 28, Doc. 295 Thompson, —, judge, speech at Union meeting, N. Y., Doc. 113 Thompson, Joseph P., D. D., notices of, P. 13; D. 38 Thompson, John R., P. 65 Thompson, W. P., D. 82 Thompson, —, Secretary, commissioner from Mississippi, D. 5; resigned, D. 12 Thouvenel, M., Doc. 191 Through Baltimore, the Voice of Pennsylvania Volunteers, P. 32 Ticknor, Frank, M. D., P. 64 Tilghman, Lloyd, Col., interview with Col. Prentiss, D. 60; Doc. 194 Tilton, Theodore, P. 29 To arms! by M. P. Lowe, P. 50 To arms! by H. A. Moore, P. 88 Tobacco, a Confederate gun charged with, P. 79 To Ellsworth, by John W. Forney, P. 89 To Massachusetts soldiers, P. 2 Tompkins, Chas. H., Lieut., charge at Fairfax Court House, Va.<
A letter from New-Orleans to the Mobile Register of March thirteenth, says that the Southern Commissioners are greatly dispirited at the reception which M. Thouvenel gave Mr. Slidell. But as Mr. Yancey observed in his speech, Slavery has made such a wall of partition between the South and Europe, that all hopes of a prompt recognition by England and France must be for the present abandoned. As to their want of cotton, I am of the opinion expressed by Mr. Semmes, of Louisiana, in the confederate Congress, and I have long since abandoned the idea that cotton is king. We have tested the power of King Cotton and found him to be wanting. We must now abandon all dependence on foreign intervention, and trust only our sword and the justice of our cause.--Mobile Register, March 18.
tary of State: Sir: I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and wathe maintenance of the federal Union. Here M. Thouvenel asked if there was not some diversity of ope and loyal action of the American people. M. Thouvenel expressed his pleasure at the assurance. Iedited by the United States to this Court. M. Thouvenel, in reply, said that no application had yet then further protracted by an inquiry from M. Thouvenel, when the new tariff would go into operatioof their claims to a separate sovereignty. M. Thouvenel expressed the opinion that the employment oofficial one, held between Mr. Faulkner and M. Thouvenel. In the former conversation, M. Thouvenel M. Thouvenel asked Mr. Faulkner whether there is not some diversity of opinion in the Cabinet of the President asmay, therefore, recall that conversation to M. Thouvenel's memory, and then assure him explicitly thant of harmony in devotion to the country. M. Thouvenel's declaration that the United States may re
Commissioners from South Carolina before the French Minister of Foreign Affairs. --A letter to the editors of the French Courrierdes Etats Uais, dated Paris,January 15, states that the Commissioners from the State of South Carolina have arrived at Paris, and presented themselves to M. Thouvenel, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, who received them with becoming courtesy and respect, but without taking side with them, or making any engagements with them. The Commissioners were some days in Paris before presentation.
ly and France against the Hungarians and other discontented provincials within its borders, together with territory on the Adriatic and the Lower Danube. Rumors of changes in the Cabinet are still current, (nobody believes what the Moniteur says;) the most accredited place Mons. Baroche as Minister of the Interior, Mons. Rouher taking his places as Minister without a port-folio and President of the Council of State; while Mons de Persigny becomes Minister of Foreign Affairs in place of Mons. Thouvenel, sent to Constantinople or to St. Petersburg, while Mons. Fould becomes Minister of Finance and negotiates the loan of $200,000,000 or $300,000,000. But the war rumors are most numerous, and if they are to be believed, Marshal McMahon has been summoned to Paris by telegraph, and has had a long conference with Louis Napoleon. There has been a long council at which all the marshals were present, at the Tuileries. The Lyons camp is to receive reinforcements. The Cabinet of Turin ha
official interview with the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, M. Thouvenel, on the subject of the recognition of the Southern Confederacy. k Times may admit of considerable doubt. The writer says: M. Thouvenel demanded to know if the Cabinet at Washington were not divided ilone were to be taken as guides in diplomatic transactions. M. Thouvenel then said that the Government of the United States need not haveives the recognition was withheld. The French Government, added M. Thouvenel, sees the present dissension in America with pain, and not only en the division or add fuel to the flames. At the same time M. Thouvenel said that the practice of France, as indeed of most of the Europ right now to prejudice the future, it would be recognized. M. Thouvenel then demanded information on the subject of the new tariff, whics hope to the Emperor and his colleagues in the Government. M. Thouvenel assured Mr. Faulkner that up to the present time he had not been
nce. An imperfect statement of Mr. Faulkner's interview with M. Thouvenel, the French courier for Foreign Affairs, has been published, the. H. Seward, Secretary of State:-- Sir:--I called to-day upon M. Thouvenel, at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and was promptly admitted tf domestic peace and the maintenance of the Federal Union. Here M. Thouvenel asked if there was not some diversity of opinion in the Cabinet ng with the deliberate and loyal action of the American people. M. Thouvenel expressed his pleasure at the assurance. I further said thanew Minister accredited by the United States to this Court. M. Thouvenel, in reply, said that no application of yet been made to him by tThe conversation was then further protracted for an inquiry from M. Thouvenel when the new tariff would go into operation, and whether it was nce in the assertion of their claims to a separate sovereignty. M. Thouvenel expressed the opinion that its employment of force would be unwi
ot intend to oppose the motion, and trusted that the investigation would be satisfactory. The Times, in an editorial on American affairs and the indignation of the North towards the attitude of England, asserts that the British public have given much sympathy towards the Federal cause, more than it ever gave to the cause of British sovereignly and union in any of its trials. France. The Corps Legislating had finally agreed to hold to the budget by a vote of 242 against 5 M. Thouvenel had addressed a courteous letter to the Turen Cabinet expressing the deepest regret at the death of Count Cavour The silence of the French Legislature on the subject attracted considerable attention. Italy. The new Ministry had taken the oath of allegiance. It was stated that Kossuth was about to take a permanent residence in Lombardy. Baron Ricasolf, in announcing the formation of the new Ministry, said that none had lost their faith in the destiny of Italy. The c
s of our correspondents in Paris and London and the extracts from our foreign files published this morning. We give the exact text of the article lately published in the Moniteur, in which Napoleon foreshadows the recognition of the rebel Confederacy as an independent Power. It is interpreted by our Paris correspondent exactly in the sense in which we read the translation received by the Etna, and the writer adds that it would have been embodied in a diplomatic circular addressed by M. Thouvenel to the French Ministers at Foreign Courts, as illustrating to them the exact position of his Majesty the Emperor towards Italy and America. Messrs. Mann, Yancey and Rost, the rebel Commissioners, were in Paris. They reported that Great Britain would soon recognize the rebel Government, but the statement was not very generally credited, although it was believed both in Paris and London that the British Cabinet were very anxious to do so, if its chief members had a plausible excuse.
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