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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 4 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 98 results in 24 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cipher despatches. (search)
pon the electoral votes of Louisiana, South Carolina, and Florida, long in dispute. Mr. Hayes needed all three States, while any one of them would have elected Mr. Tilden. Pending the result, many despatches in cipher passed between Mr. Tilden's friends and persons in the South, which, when translated and published in the New Yohem would have elected Mr. Tilden. Pending the result, many despatches in cipher passed between Mr. Tilden's friends and persons in the South, which, when translated and published in the New York Tribune, 1877, suggested attempted bribery. A great scandal arose, and Mr. Tilden publicly disclaimed all knowledge of the despatches.hem would have elected Mr. Tilden. Pending the result, many despatches in cipher passed between Mr. Tilden's friends and persons in the South, which, when translated and published in the New York Tribune, 1877, suggested attempted bribery. A great scandal arose, and Mr. Tilden publicly disclaimed all knowledge of the despatches.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Electoral commission. (search)
emed inevitable. The result of the election was in doubt for some time, each party claiming for its candidate a majority. In the electoral college 185 votes were necessary to the success of a candidate. It was decided after the election that Mr. Tilden had 184. Then ensued a long and bitter contest in South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana over the official returns, each party charging the other with fraud. There was intense excitement in the Gulf region. In order to secure fair play, Presto go to Louisiana and Florida to be present at the reception of the returns and the counting of the votes. The result was that it was decided, on the count by returning boards, that Hayes had a majority of the electoral votes. The friends of Mr. Tilden were not satisfied. There was a, Democratic majority in the House of Representatives. On Dec. 4 a resolution was adopted, providing for the investigation of the action of returning boards in South Carolina, Florida, and Louisiana. There was
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York public Library, the (search)
New York public Library, the Arthur E. Bostwick, of the New York Public Library, writes: The present New York Public Library— Astor, Lenox, and Tilden foundations—is the result, as its name indicates, of the consolidation of several pre-existing institutions. The three whose names appear in the title were united on Maythe public of James Lenox, owned its site and building on Fifth Avenue, between 70th and 71st streets, with 86,000 volumes and an annual income of $20,500. The Tilden trust, created by the will of Samuel J. Tilden, possessed Mr. Tilden's private library of about 20,000 volumes and an endowment fund of about $2,000,000, but neitMr. Tilden's private library of about 20,000 volumes and an endowment fund of about $2,000,000, but neither lands nor buildings. The Public Library thus began its existence with a total number of volumes of 373,147 and an endowment of about $3,500,000. The library as thus constituted was for reference only. On March 25, 1896, in an address to the mayor of the city regarding the future policy of the library, the trustees offered
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Presidential elections. (search)
ts progenitor. (b) No candidate having a majority of the electoral vote, the House of Representatives elected Adams. (c) Candidate of the Anti-masonic party. (d) There being no choice, the Senate elected Johnson. (e) Eleven Southern States, being within the belligerent territory, did not vote. (f) Three Southern States disfranchised. (g) Horace Greeley died after election, and Democratic electors scattered their vote. (h) There being a dispute over the electoral votes of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina, they were referred by Congress to an electoral commission composed of eight Republicans and seven Democrats, which, by a strict party vote, awarded 185 electoral votes to Hayes and 184 to Tilden. (i) Free Democrat. (j) Free Silver Prohibition party. (k) In Massachusetts. There was also a Native American ticket in that State, which received 184 votes. (m) Middle-of-the-road, or Anti-fusion People's party. (n) United Christian party. (o) Union Reform party.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
nt, June 27; six nominations for President made; first ballot gives Samuel J. Tilden, of New York, 417; Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana, 140; on the second ballot Tilden receives 535 votes, and his nomination made unanimous, June 28; Thomas A. Hendricks nominated for Vice-President by acclamation......June 29, 1876 Centenary o for legal-tender notes, and declares the trade dollar no longer a legal tender......July 22, 1876 Hendricks's letter of acceptance dated......July 24, 1876 Tilden's letter of acceptance dated......July 31, 1876 W. W. Belknap acquitted by the Senate; vote on first article, 35 guilty, 25 not guilty......Aug. 1, 1876 Colineration in the United States of body of Baron De Palm, at the crematory in Washington, Pa.......Dec. 6, 1876 Returning boards give Hayes 185 electoral votes, Tilden, 184; election disputed (the country in great excitement till the following March)......Dec. 6, 1876 Com. Cornelius Vanderbilt, born 1794, dies at New York....
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 26: Grant's second term (search)
upport Democrats control House of Representatives Tilden and Hendricks nominated Dana against Electoral Commission claims Tilden was elected by the ballots in the boxes W. E. Chandler's letter against overthrow of Ph took place that year. It will be recalled that Tilden and Hendricks were the candidates of the Democrats,on the face of the returns, had given a majority to Tilden and Hendricks, and which, if allowed to stand, mader of leading Democrats, including, as many believe, Tilden himself; and the commission was composed of five sun, having done its utmost to carry the country for Tilden, and having come so close to success, opposed the Eoper warrant for it, either in law or justice; that Tilden was legally elected by a majority of the votes depo been in favor of Hayes and Wheeler rather than for Tilden and Hendricks. It contended to the end that the onhe country. It recounted all the measures by which Tilden was deprived of the honors to which many believed h
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 27: administration of President Hayes begins a new era (search)
r was neither fully developed nor fully understood till his public career was drawing to a close. Besides, it should be remembered that Dana was a firm friend of Tilden, and, so long as his faculties were unimpaired, naturally regarded him as the legitimate leader of his party. Both Cleveland and Dana were famed for their indepeprofoundly grateful to General Butler for the course he had taken in regard to the Electoral Commission, and particularly for the desire he had manifested to have Tilden installed in the place which had been unjustly given to Hayes. In further support of his candidate, Dana contended that all Democrats who could not for any reasoto reduce the continually increasing surplus. Many suggestions were made and considered, but the one which received the Sun's heartiest approval was set forth in Tilden's letter to the speaker of the House of Representatives, urging that no reduction of taxation should be made till a proper and adequate system of sea-coast defenc
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
T. Tallahatchee River, 207. Tallapoosa, 416. Tammany, 425, 427, 448, 449. Tax on bonds, 400. Taylor, Bayard, 123, 132, 133, 177. Taylor, General, 99, 236. Tennessee, 232. Tennessee River, 204, 233, 268,291. Terry, Judge, kills Senator Broderick, 153. Thiers, 66-68, 72. Thomas, General George H., 189, 256, 259, 261, 262, 264, 267,271, 275, 276, 279, 280-283, 285, 291, 292, 293, 297, 314, 339, 349,350, 351, 353, 367. Thompson, Jacob, 358. Thucydides, 56. Tilden, Samuel J., 442, 443, 445, 460, 462, 470. Times, New York, 128, 129. Tombigbee River, 250. Toombs, Southerner, 153. Townsend, Mr., 26. Train, George Francis, 382. Transcendentalism, 19, 27, 33. Treaty of Washington, 421. Tribune, New York, 50, 60-63, 72, 77, 92, 94, 96-100, 108-110, 113-115, 118-121,123, 125, 127-129, 132-134, 136-141, 144, 146-154, 158-162, 165-168, 171-173, 175-183, 186,212, 401,413 414,432, 440, 500. Trumbull, Senator, 370, 431. Tupper, poet, 153. Turchin,
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 6: the tariff question (search)
ve him. He was the author of an article in the Merchants' Magazine of May, 1841, which replied to a free-trader's argument, and he and McElrath began, in 1842, the publication of a magazine called The American Laborer, whose purpose was the inculcation of the protective doctrine. In November, 1843, he and Joseph Blunt defended the affirmative side in a debate in the Tabernacle in New York city on the question, Resolved, That a protective tariff is conducive to our national prosperity, Samuel J. Tilden and Parke Godwin taking the negative. As he printed his argument on this occasion in his autobiography in 1868, it may be accepted as defining the groundwork of his belief. He laid down and explained five positions: 1. A nation which would be prosperous must prosecute various branches of industry, and supply its vital wants mainly by the labor of its own hands. History proved that an agricultural and grain-exporting nation had always been a poor nation. 2. There is a natural
political issue, 114; Greeley's early advocacy of protection, 115-118; Clay campaign of 1844, 119, 120; Polk's position, 121; R. J. Walker's views, 121; tariff vs. slavery, 161; part in the Liberal Republican campaign of 1872,232-234; Liberal Republican plank, 240; Greeley's acceptance of it, 246. Taylor, Bayard, 72, 96. Taylor, Gen. Z., Greeley's listless support of, 148-151; on admission of California, 157. Temperance, Greeley's views, 18, 172. Texas annexation, 137-148. Tilden, Samuel J., 116. Times, New York, started, 94. Tribune, New York, Greeley's estimate of, 56; his plan of, 58-60; capital to start with, 59; its birth and early struggles, 61; weekly and semi editions begun, 62, 63; price, 63; war with the Sun, 63; its news character, 65-67; growth of subscriptions and advertisements, 69, 70; source of its influence, 71; associate editors, 72; express news-gathering, 73-76; value of Greeley's isms, 76; Brisbane's contributions, 80; support of Association schem
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