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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 226 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 50 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
de loss (in the campaign): k, 48; w, 285; m, 49 = 382. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 44th Ala.,----3d Ga.,----; 22d Ga.,----; 48th Ga.,----. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 32; w, 192; m, 34 = 258. Artillery, Maj. J. S. Saunders: La. Battery (Donaldsville Art'y), Capt. Victor Maurin; Va. Battery (Huger's); Va. Battery, Lieut. C. R. Phelps; Va. Battery (Thompson's or Grimes's). (Loss of artillery not separately reported.) Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Toombs's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. Toombs (in temporary command of a division), Col. Henry L. Benning: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes (k), Maj. Skidmore Harris (w); 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican (k); 17th Ga., Capt. J. A. McGregor; 20th Ga., Col. John B. Cumming. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 16; w, 122; in, 22 = 160. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga.,----; 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
Confederate States Navy, which never assumed formidable proportions excepting when ships, foreign built, armed, and manned, were permitted to enter the service. The number, character, and performances of the privateers commissioned by Davis and Toombs during the spring and early summer of 1861, will be considered hereafter. S. R. Mallory. With the hostile proclamations of the President and the Chief of the conspirators, the great conflict fairly began. There was no longer any tenable neuExpress said, on the 25th: April, 1861.--Our policy at this time should be to seize the old Federal Capital, and take old Lincoln arid his Cabinet prisoners of war. The Milledgeville (Georgia) Southern Recorder of the 30th, inspired by men like Toombs, Cobb, Iverson, and other leaders, said:--The Government of the Confederate States must possess the city of Washington. It is folly to think it can be used any longer as the Headquarters of the Lincoln Government, as no access can be had to it e
a large majority in the House and a practical control of the Senate, three separate acts were passed, organizing the Territories of Colorado, Nevada, and Dakotah respectively — the three together covering a very large proportion of all the remaining territory of the United States. All these acts were silent with regard to Slavery; leaving whatever rights had accrued to the South under the Constitution, as interpreted and affirmed by the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott decision, not merely unimpaired, but unassailed and unquestioned, by any Federal legislation or action. The passage of these acts in this form was certainly intended to soothe the prevalent madness, and to strengthen the Unionists of the South, especially of the Border States; though it does not seem to have had any such effect. And, indeed, it is not probable that any concession could have been made, after the withdrawal of Toombs, Davis, etc., from Washington, that would not have evoked the stern answer- Too late!
and rear of Burnside, leaving but little over 3,000 men with Porter. Burnside's corps held our extreme left, opposite the lowest of the three bridges crossing the Antietam. He was ordered, at 8 A. M., to cross this one, which was held by Gen. R. Toombs, with the 2d and 20th Georgia, backed by some sharp-shooters and the batteries of Gen. D. R. Jones, on Longstreet's right wing. Several feeble attempts to execute this order having been successively repulsed, Burnside was further ordered to ton's brigade), Liddell, 11th Miss., Tew, 2d N. C., Barnes, 12th S. C., Mulligan, 15th Ga., Barclay, 23d do., and Smith, 27th do. Among their wounded were Maj.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, Brig.-Gens. Lawton, Rhodes, Ripley, Armistead, Gregg, of S. C., R. Toombs and Wright, of Ga. Lee, of course, did not care to renew the battle on the morrow of such a day; and McClellan, though reenforced that morning by about 14,000 men, stood still also. He says he purposed to renew the combat the next morning;
sults of his campaign, 689. Thomas, Gen. (Rebel), at second Bull Run, 189. Thompson, Col., killed at Hartsville, 447. Thompson, Col. N. C., killed at Centerville, 396. Thoroughfare Gap, operations in, 182. Tidball, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 156. Tilden, Maj., 38th N. Y., killed at Chantilly, 188. tile, Gen., wounded at Centerville, 396. Tilghman, Gen. Lloyd, at Fort Henry, 45; surrenders, 47; killed at Champion Hills, 309. Todd, Geo., operates as a guerrilla, 447. Toombs, Gen. Robert, wounded at Antietam, 208-10. Topping, Lt.-Col., 71st Indiana, killed, 315. tower, Gen., in the battle of Gainesville, 187. Tribune office, of New York, assailed by draft rioters, 504. Trimble, Brig.-Gen. J. R., at Malvern Hill, 166; takes Manassas Junction, 180; at second Bull Run, 189; wounded at Gettysburg, 389. Trumbull, Hon. Lyman, on freeing the slaves of Rebels, 263. Tucker, Capt., raids from Charleston, 465. Tunstall's Station, scene of operations, 1
posite the right wing of General Longstreet, commanded by Brigadier-General D. R. Jones. This bridge was defended by General Toombs with two regiments of his brigade, the Second and Twentieth Georgia, and the batteries of General Jones. General ToomGeneral Toombs's small command repulsed five different assaults, made by a greatly superior force, and maintained its position with distinguished gallantry. In the afternoon, the enemy began to extend his line as if to cross the Antietam below the bridge, and at four P. M., Toombs's regiments retired from the position they had so bravely held. The enemy immediately crossed the bridge in large numbers and advanced against General Jones, who held the crest with less than two thousand men. After a determin. The progress of the enemy was immediately arrested, and his line began to waver. At this moment General Jones ordered Toombs to charge the flank, while Archer, supported by Branch and Gregg, moved upon the front of the Federal line. The enemy ma
in line of battle immediately in front of General Toombs's right regiment, then posted in a ravine d Captain Thurston, of my staff, to notify General Toombs of this fact, and to order Brown's and Mooon to advance to the attack, relying upon him (Toombs) for support; that Colonel Anderson had at oncugh the swamp, followed closely by that of General Toombs, who took position upon his (Anderson's) lt be exaggerated. Owing to less distance, General Toombs reached the plateau first, and advanced di the attack had been made by order of Brigadier-General Toombs without the authority from myself or Very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. Toombs. Brigadier-General First Brigade, First Diviton, of General Jones's staff, was sent to General Toombs, to notify him of the fact. From some cause, not understood by me, General Toombs sent Captain Thurston to me to make the attack, and as Captegiment Georgia Vols., July 26, 1862. To General R. Toombs: General: Pursuant to orders received[43 more...]
was placed in such a position as to enable General Toombs to move his brigade directly against his fGeorgiaToombs's,Hood's,63743 Fifteenth GeorgiaToombs's,Hood's,63036 Sixth South CarolinaJenkins's,e heights, and the brigades of Generals Rodes, Toombs, and Jones coming forward, occupied them at Dellery fire at long range, and the reply of General Toombs's batteries, about a half mile to my left.on of that city, hearing heavy firing, leaving Toombs's brigade in command of Hagerstown, and Elevens brigade had been engaged, and near where General Toombs had been engaged. This was the first timeigade, which, in the compulsory absence of General Toombs until late in the battle, I car-ried into ervant, Henry L. Benning. Colonel, commanding Toombs's Brigade. Report of Colonel E. M. Law of he bridge on the Antietam, in front of General Toombs's brigade, with his two Napoleons, opened fireng section of his battery, and reported to General Toombs with his two three-inch rifles and a secti[47 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
n. W. Mahone. 6th Virginia. 12th Virginia. 16th Virginia. 41st Virginia. 49th Virginia. Wright's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright. 3d Georgia. 22d Georgia. 44th Georgia. 48th Georgia. Jones's division. Brigadier-General D. R. Jones. Toombs's Brigade. Colonel H. L. Benning. Brig.-Gen. R. Toombs. 2d Georgia. 15th Georgia. 17th Georgia. 20th Georgia. Drayton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. T. F. Drayton. 50th Georgia. 51st Georgia. 15th South Carolina. Phillips's Georgia Legion. JoBrig.-Gen. R. Toombs. 2d Georgia. 15th Georgia. 17th Georgia. 20th Georgia. Drayton's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. T. F. Drayton. 50th Georgia. 51st Georgia. 15th South Carolina. Phillips's Georgia Legion. Jones's Brigade. Col. Geo. T. Anderson. 1st Georgia, (Regulars.) 7th Georgia. 8th Georgia. 9th Georgia. 11th Georgia. Wilcox's division. Brigadier-General C. M. Wilcox. Wilcox's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. C. M. Wilcox. 8th Alabama. 9th Alabama. 10th Alabama. 11th Alabama. Anderson's Va. Bat., (Thomas Artillery.) Pryor's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. R. A. Pryor. 14th Alabama. 5th Florida. 8th Florida. 3d Virginia. Featherston's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston. Colonel Carnot Posey. 1
Doc. 5.--Toombs' address, Dec. 23, 1860. I came here to secure your constitutional rights, and to demonstrate to you that you can get no guarantee for those rights from your Northern confederates. The whole subject was referred to a Committee of Thirteen in the Senate. I was appointed on the Committee, and accepted the trust. I submitted propositions, which, so far from receiving decided support from a single member of the Republican party of the Committee, were all treated with derision or contempt. A vote was then taken in the Committee on amendments to the Constitution proposed by Hon. J. J. Crittenden, and each and all of them were voted against unanimously by the Black Republican members of the Committee. In addition to these facts, a majority of the Black Republican members of the Committee declared distinctly that they had no guarantees to offer, which was silently acquiesced in by the other members. The Black Republican members of this Committee of Thirteen are repr
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