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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 86 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton, John 1585-1652 (search)
ir temporalls, so feede them with your spiritualls: winne them to the love of Christ, for whom Christ died. They never yet refused the Gospell, and therefore more hope they will now receive it. Who knoweth whether God have reared this whole Plantation for such an end: Vse 2. Secondly, for consolation to them that are planted by God in any place, that finde rooting and establishing from God, this is a cause of much encouragement unto you, that what hee hath planted he will maintaine, every plantation his right hand hath not planted shalbe rooted up, but his owne plantation shall prosper, & flourish. When he promiseth peace and safety, what enemies shalstbe able to make the promise of God of none effect? Neglect not walls, and bulwarkes, and fortifications for your owne defence; but ever let the name of the Lord be your strong Tower; and the word of his Promise the Rocke of your refuge. His word that made heaven and earth will not faile, till heaven and earth be no more Amen.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
and Salvador. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. (See Costa Rica.) Paraguay and Uruguay. William R. Finch, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Montevideo. Persia. Herbert W. Bowen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Teheran. Peru. Irving B. Dudley, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lima. Portugal. John N. Irwin, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Lisbon. Russia. Charlemagne Tower, Ambassador Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, St. Petersburg. Siam. Hamilton King, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Bangkok. Spain. Bellamy Storer, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Madrid. Sweden and Norway. William W. Thomas, Jr., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Stockholm. Switzerland. John G. A. Leishman, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Berne. Turkey. Oscar S. Straus, Envoy Extraordinary
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tower, Charlemagne 1848- (search)
Tower, Charlemagne 1848- Diplomatist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., April 17, 1848; graduated at Harvard College in 1872; admitted to the bar in 1878; president of the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad in 1882-87; United States minister to Austria-Hungary in 1897-99, and was appointed United States ambassador to Russia in the latter year. He is the author of The Marquis de La Fayette in the American Revolution (2 volumes).
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
the Freshman year; Thomas Hopkinson, of New Sharon, Me.; and Charlemagne Tower, of Paris, N. Y. Of these, only Stearns and Tower survive. Tower survive. Browne studied law, opening an office in Salem, and afterwards removing to Boston. His mind and character were of an original cast, and he the Boston and Worcester Railroad Corporation. He died in 1856. Tower practised law for a time, and then diverged from the profession. Hating influences of your buoyant spirits and refreshing sociality. Tower wrote to him, Feb. 3, 1833, It is an unusual pleasure that one of ywith his classmate. Frost, to make a pedestrian trip to Weymouth. Tower remembers him as wearing in college a cloak of blue camlet lined wiwarded parts. The highest honors were borne by Hopkinson, Stearns, Tower, and Andrews. Sumner's was an inferior part, not equal to his genewere given for dissertations on this subject,— one to his classmate Tower, and the other to Benjamin R. Curtis, who was then a member of the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
lected science. I am glad to hear this news. Tower wrote, Nov. 1, recommending Dibdin's Introductsmates were greatly pleased with his success. Tower wrote, June 5, I rejoice with you, Sumner, in e which Webster says the public hold of you. Tower, Stearns, and Frost; but, while they were not ne. Macte nova virtute Sumner's letters to Tower and Stearns, which are preserved, are playful,it. Letters to classmates. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Boston, Sept. 27, 18s a like time with you soon. C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Albany, N. Y. Boston, Friday Evening, sius, Sat. V. 66, 67; quoted with reference to Tower's remissness in correspondence. . . . Your . From your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Boston, Friday, June 10, 1831. my d. . . . Your friend truly, C. S To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Boston, Monday Eveniising from the severance from your studies. Tower had been obliged to suspend his studies in ord[4 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
199. Your true friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Law School, Divinity friend in truth, Charles Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Law School, Jan. 31, 1832. cipated the sorrowful intelligence it bore. Tower's father had died, March 15, at St. Augustine.d piety. You kindly mentioned my sister. Tower, Hopkinson, Stearns, and Converse wrote to Summ your true friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Boston, Sunday, July 29, 1832. my d Your affectionate friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1832 our sincere friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower. Cambridge, Dec. 17, 1832. my dear TTower,—A letter from you is now something of an event in my meagre life. Last year and the year befe Tower. Wednesday, June 12, 1833. my dear Tower,—I send by your brother for your acceptance a eve me your faithful friend, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Dane Law College, Monday, July 15, 183[7 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
elightful character; and had pleasant interviews with his friend George Gibbs, and his classmate Tower. Impressed with the contrast between the street life of New York and that of Boston, more striking then than now, he said to Tower, as they sat together in a parlor of the Astor House, looking out on Broadway, and listening to its tumultuous life, Well, this is a noisy city. I don't know, hos which are generally used with that view. Most truly your friend, Chas. Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower, New York. Tower had become a student in the law-office of Messrs. John L. And James L.Tower had become a student in the law-office of Messrs. John L. And James L. Graham, of New York city. Boston, June 28, 1835. my dear Tower,—. . . I was truly gratified by the morsel of praise from Anthon; John Anthon had commended Sumner's review of Tayler's Law GlosTower,—. . . I was truly gratified by the morsel of praise from Anthon; John Anthon had commended Sumner's review of Tayler's Law Glossary. to have one's writing remembered a year is no small gratification, especially if that is the only reward. My labors in the Jurist are pressing and heavy, and lack the exciting stimulus of pecu
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
perseverance and ability. Remember me most kindly to your family, particularly to those two sons (boys when I saw them) whose appearance gave such promise of future excellence; and believe me Very sincerely yours, Charles Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. Boston, Sept. 18, 1843. my dear Tower,—I had the pleasure of receiving your eloquent discourse only day before yesterday; and, without leaving my seat, I at once enjoyed it to the end. I was truly delighted to see theTower,—I had the pleasure of receiving your eloquent discourse only day before yesterday; and, without leaving my seat, I at once enjoyed it to the end. I was truly delighted to see the influence which you are exerting upon your part of the country; for I know that it will always be employed in the cause of human improvement. Perhaps we might differ by some shades on some of the topics that arise in your discourse. I have always thought it a misfortune that foreigners may so easily be admitted to the privileges of citizenship. It were better, as it seems to me, if the law required a residence of ten years, instead of five. The latter period is too short for them to acquir
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
nfer with you. Your notes are so thorough and full as to raise the standard of my labors and make me despair. To Charlemagne Tower, Waterville, N. Y. April 10, 1844. my dear Tower.—. . . I wish you would offer your brother my congratulations Tower.—. . . I wish you would offer your brother my congratulations on his success in giving to the world so valuable a work. Illustrations of the Croton Aqueduct. I am always very happy to know of any one, in the swift currents of American life, who checks for a while the contagious desire for wealth, and devotenance, and the conscience which sat ruler of all thoughts and acts. . . . Ever affectionately thine, C. S. To Charlemagne Tower. Boston, Dec. 4, 1844. my dear Tower,—Your kind, very kind letter, of Aug. 19, did not reach me till last SaturTower,—Your kind, very kind letter, of Aug. 19, did not reach me till last Saturday,—only three days since,—when I saw your brother Marion Then in college at Cambridge. for the first time after the lapse of several months. A huge cantle has been cut from the period of my active life. As long ago as last June, I was un
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
or any others you may think it not improper to approach in this way. Hillard has already written to Mr. Bates; so has Mr. Lawrence to Mr. Crittenden. Mr. Dix, the new Senator from New York, I am told, is a gentleman of taste in art and letters. He is a warm friend of Crawford. Will Texas be admitted? We hear to-day that the chances are against the present resolutions. If Mr. Peters is still in Washington, remember me to him. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Charlemagne Tower he wrote, March 30, 1845:— At this moment, our City Government is imbecile,—being the miserable offspring of Native Americanism. It has so little of the confidence of the people that it cannot do much under the new Act; An Act authorizing the building of an aqueduct for the introduction of water into the city of Boston. and it is probable that no important steps will be taken till a new government is organized. I heard, through a friend in Prussia, that Baron Humboldt ha