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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor (search)
On either side were deep chasms or mountain walls. A direct attack along the road was an impossibility. A flank movement seemed equally impossible. After the arrival of the commanding-general upon the scene, reconnaissances were sent out to find, or to make, a road by which the rear of the enemy's works might be reached without a front attack. These reconnaissances were made under the supervision of Captain Robert E. Lee, assisted by Lieutenants P. G. T. Beauregard, Isaac I. Stevens, Z. B. Tower, G. W. Smith, George B. McClellan, and J. G. Foster, of the corps of engineers, all officers who attained rank and fame, on one side or the other, in the great conflict for the preservation of the unity of the nation. The reconnaissance was completed, and the labor of cutting out and making roads by the flank of the enemy was effected by the 17th of the month. This was accomplished without the knowledge of Santa Anna or his army, and over ground where he supposed it impossible. On the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Treaty of peace-mexican Bull fights-regimental quartermaster-trip to Popocatepetl-trip to the caves of Mexico (search)
Lieutenant Richard Anderson, who commanded a corps at Spottsylvania; Captain [H. H.] Sibley, a major-general, and, after the war, for a number of years in the employ of the Khedive of Egypt; Captain George Crittenden, a rebel general; S. B. Buckner, who surrendered Fort Donelson; and Mansfield Lovell, who commanded at New Orleans before that city fell into the hands of the National troops. Of those who remained on our side there were Captain Andrew Porter, Lieutenant C. P. Stone and Lieutenant Z. B. Tower. There were quite a number of other officers, whose names I cannot recollect. At a little village (Ozumba) near the base of Popocatapetl, where we purposed to commence the ascent, we procured guides and two pack mules with forage for our horses. High up on the mountain there was a deserted house of one room, called the Vaqueria, which had been occupied years before by men in charge of cattle ranging on the mountain. The pasturage up there was very fine when we saw it, and ther
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The battle of Franklin-the battle of Nashville (search)
esboro, Stevenson, Bridgeport and Chattanooga. Thomas had previously given up Decatur and had been reinforced by A. J. Smith's two divisions [three] just returned from Missouri. He also had Steedman's division and R. S. Granger's, which he had drawn from the front. His quartermaster's men, about ten thousand in number, had been organized and armed under the command of the chief quartermaster, General J. L. Donaldson, and placed in the fortifications under the general supervision of General Z. B. Tower, of the United States Engineers. Hood was allowed to move upon Nashville, and to invest that place almost without interference. Thomas was strongly fortified in his position, so that he would have been safe against the attack of Hood. He had troops enough even to annihilate him in the open field. To me his delay was unaccountable-sitting there and permitting himself to be invested, so that, in the end, to raise the siege he would have to fight the enemy strongly posted behind f
s peculiar to their corps, no words of mine can overrate their services. The officers thus engaged are Major John L. Smith, Captains R. E. Lee and John Sanders, First Lieutenants J. L. Mason, P. G. T. Beauregard, and I. I. Stevens, Second Lieutenants Z. B. Tower and G. W. Smith, Brevet Second Lieutenants G. B. McClellan and J. G. Foster. The obligation lies upon me also to speak of the highly meritorious deportment and valuable services of the sappers and miners attached to the expedition.tteries in front swept the space before them with a most destructive fire, under which Pillow's command, mostly composed of volunteers, reeled and fell into confusion. General Pillow, in his official report to the commander-in-chief, says, Lieutenants Tower and McClellan, of the Corps of Engineers, displayed great zeal and activity in the discharge of their duties in connection with my command. After the battle of Cerro Gordo, Lieutenant McClellan accompanied the advance corps under General
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 4: California. 1855-1857. (search)
re and Tehama Hotel; James Smiley, contractor for building the Custom-House, who owed us two notes of twenty thousand and sixteen thousand dollars, for which we held, as collateral, two acceptances of the collector of the port, Major R. P. Hammond, for twenty thousand dollars each; besides other private parties that I need not name. The acceptances given to Smiley were for work done on the Custom-House, but could not be paid until the work was actually laid in the walls, and certified by Major Tower, United States Engineers; but Smiley had an immense amount of granite, brick, iron, etc., on the ground, in advance of construction, and these acceptances were given him expressly that he might raise money thereon for the payment of such materials. Therefore, as soon as I got my dinner, I took my saddle-horse, and rode to Captain Folsom's house, where I found him in great pain and distress, mental and physical. He was sitting in a chair, and bathing his head with a sponge. I explaine
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
d and thirty-three wounded, and eleven hundred and four prisoners or missing: aggregate, twenty-three hundred and twenty-six. The next day General Schofield crossed the Harpeth without trouble, and fell back to the defenses of Nashville. Meantime General Thomas had organized the employes of the Quartermaster's Department into a corps, commanded by the chief-quartermaster, General J. L. Donaldson, and placed them in the fortifications of Nashville, under the general direction of Major-General Z. B. Tower, now of the United States Engineers. He had also received the two veteran divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, under General A. J. Smith, long absent and long expected; and he had drawn from Chattanooga and Decatur (Alabama) the divisions of Steedman and of R. S. Granger. These, with General Schofield's army and about ten thousand good cavalry, under General J. H. Wilson, constituted a strong army, capable not only of defending Nashville, but of beating Hood in the open field. Yet
, 1867. Smith, John E., Mar. 2, 1867. Smith, W. F., Mar. 13, 1865. Stanley, David S., Mar. 13, 1865. Steele, Frederick, Mar. 13, 1865. Stoneman, G., Mar. 13, 1865. Sturgis, S. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Sumner, Edwin V., May 6, 1864. Swayne, Wager, Mar. 2, 1867. Swords, Thomas, Mar. 13, 1865. Sykes, George, Mar. 13, 1865. Terry, Alfred H., Mar. 13, 1865. Thomas, Charles, Mar. 13, 1865. Thomas, Lorenzo, Mar. 13, 1865. Torbert, A. T. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Totten, J. G., April 21, 1864. Tower, Z. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Townsend, E. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Turner, J. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Tyler, Robt. O., Mar. 13, 1865. Upton, Emory, Mar. 13, 1865 Van Vliet, S., Mar. 13, 1865. Vinton, D. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Warren, G. K., Mar. 13, 1865. Webb, Alex. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Weitzel, G., Mar. 13, 1865. Wheaton, Frank, Mar. 13, 1865. Whipple, A. W., May 7, 1863. Whipple, Wm. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Willcox, O. B., Mar. 2, 1867. Williams, Seth, Mar. 13, 1865. Wilson, James H., Mar. 13, 1865. Wood
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 13: (search)
sand men, was therefore inferior to the enemy; and General Schofield was instructed, in case the enemy made a general advance, to fall back slowly toward Nashville, fighting till he should be reenforced by General Thomas in person. * * * * Meantime General Thomas had organized the employs of the quartermaster's department into a corps, commanded by the Chief-Quartermaster, General J. L. Donaldson, and placed them in the fortifications of Nashville, under the general direction of Major-General Z. B. Tower, now of the United States Engineers. He had also received the two veteran divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, under General A. J. Smith, long absent and long expected, and he had drawn from Chattanooga and Decatur (Alabama), the divisions of Steedman and of R. S. Granger. These, with General Schofield's army, and about ten thousand good cavalry, under General J. H. Wilson, constituted a strong army, capable, not only of defending Nashville, but of beating Hood in the open field.
Z. B. Tower Brigadier GeneralJune 10, 1862, to June 26, 1862. 2d Brigade, Ord's Division, Department of the Rappahannock Brigadier GeneralJune 26, 1862, to Aug. 30, 1862. 2d Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of Virginia
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 9: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
ders, I returned to my brigade and directed commanders to move out their regiments, while I proceeded to point out to General Tower, of Ricketts' division, who had now come up to relieve me, the exact position I had held for so many hours. Althoughe enemy had moved his batteries to the positions occupied during the fight by our own. My description of positions to General Tower concluded, ambulances sent with my command and scouts taken from my own escort recalled, I was ready to leave; but totwo hundred men, over the ground from whence the whole of Banks's corps had retreated. On my right our troops, under General Tower, still held their strong point at Brown's cottage, and held it through the night, as I had maintained it through theI had occupied until I was ordered forward to the stubble-field. This was the position I surrendered after dark to General Tower, of Ricketts' division. Our right never was attacked, it was too strong; but, alas! it was too evident that Bank
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