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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
tween seventeen and fifty. I reminded him that I was a minister of the gospel, and not subject to military duty. He replied, that if upon my arrival in Washington that fact should appear, I would be released. He ordered me to be taken to a Captain Townsend, who had charge of the prisoners. I declared my purpose to return home for a change of underclothing before I would consent to go, and he might use his pleasure either to take my pledge to return, or to send a man with me as a guard. Yankon of country passed over by an invading army closes when the military occupation ceases, and any pledge or parole given by such persons, in regard to future service, is null and of no effect. By order of the Secretary of war. [Signed] E. D. Townsend, A. A. G. Upon this order General J. A. Early, in a recent communication, makes the following eminently just comments: It is very manifest that that order was issued for the purpose of embarrassing General Lee's army with the guardin
ely on reaching camp, he issued orders that all officers and men of his brigade should wear conspicuously on the front of their caps a round piece of red cloth to designate them. This became generally known as the Kearny Patch. I think General Townsend is incorrect in saying that Kearny issued orders immediately on reaching camp for all officers and men to wear the patch; first, because the testimony of officers of the old Third Corps to-day is that the order was first directed to officersred in general orders to a lozenge as a piece of scarlet cloth, nor have given the option of having the crown-piece of the cap made of scarlet cloth if the lamented Kearny's instructions had originally been to wear a lozenge. This being so, General Townsend's quoted description of the badge as a round piece of red cloth is probably erroneous. As there were no red goods at hand when Kearny initiated this move, he is said to have given up his own red blanket to be cut into these patches.
ln and the insane despotism of Puritanical New England. The address abounds in misrepresentation, as to the policy of the National Government.--(Doc. 44.) A meeting of prominent citizens was held at the Astor House, New York, with a view to organize some plan to advance the movement for the abolition of slavery. --N. Y. Times, September 13. The following despatch was received to-night at the Headquarters of the Army at Washington, D. C.: St. Louis, September 12, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-Gen.: The report of Gen. Pope to-day from Hunneville, says he made night marches on Green last Sunday, who, however, got notice of his approach, but was successful in completing the dispersion of three thousand rebel forces, leaving behind them much baggage, provisions, and forage; also the public property seized by Green at Shelborne. Gen. Pope's infantry was too much fatigued to pursue. The horsemen, however, followed in pursuit ten or fifteen miles, until t
te suspicion. The following is the second despatch of Colonel Baird, in answer to General Garfield's inquiry as to his reasons for asking: No. 3.--Colonel Baird explains the cause of his suspicions. Franklin, June 8, 10.30 P. M. To Brigadier-General Garfield, Chief of Staff: Two men came into camp about dark, dressed in our uniforms, with horse equipments to correspond, saying that they were Colonel Auton, Inspector-General, and Major Dunlap, assistant, having an order from Adjutant-General Townsend, and your order to inspect outposts, but their conduct was so singular that we have arrested them. They insisted that it was important to go to Nashville to-night. The one representing himself as Colonel Auton is probably a regular officer of the old army, but Colonel Watkins, commanding cavalry here, in whom I have the utmost confidence, is of the opinion that they are spies, who have either forged or captured these orders. They can give no consistent account of their conduct.
s Geo. B. McClellan and J. C. Fremont, U. S. A., and Major-Generals J. A. Dix and N. P. Banks, U. S. V., have precedence respectively in point of rank over Major-General B. F. Butler, U. S. V. Jos. G. Totten, Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. J. H. Martindale, Brigadier-General and Military Governor, D. C. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. J. Holt. Approved. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. ls Geo. B. McClellan and J. C. Fremont, U. S. A., and Major-Generals J. A. Dix and N. P. Banks, U. S. V., have precedence respectively in point of rank over Major-General B. F. Butler, U. S. V. Jos. G. Totten, Brigadier-General and Chief of Engineers. J. H. Martindale, Brigadier-General and Military Governor, D. C. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. J. Holt. Approved. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General.
he receipt, at the hands of Colonel Schriver, Inspector-General, of thirty-one flags and one officer's sword, a part of the trophies won by your army at the battle of Gettysburgh. These proofs of the heroic bravery and good conduct through which such brilliant and substantial results have been won to the country, will be carefully preserved as objects of the highest interest. A list is herewith inclosed. I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. Major-General Geo. G. Meade, U. S. Vols., Commanding Army Potomac. Battle-flags captured at Gettysburgh, July 8, 1863. First Virginia infantry--captured by Eighty-second New-York volunteers. Third Virginia infantry--no statement of capture. Seventh Virginia infantry--captured by Eighty second New-York volunteers. Eighth Virginia infantry--captured by private Piam Haines, Co. E, Sixteenth Vermont volunteers. Ninth Virginia infantry--statem
s, permit no distinction as to color in the treatment of prisoners of war as public enemies. To sell or enslave any captured person on account of his color, and for no offence against the laws of war, is a relapse into barbarism and a crime against the civilization of the age. The Government of the United States will give the same protection to all its soldiers, and if the enemy shall sell or enslave any one because of his color, the offence shall be punished by retaliation upon the enemy's prisoners in our possession. It is therefore ordered that for every soldier of the United States killed in violation of the laws of war, a rebel soldier shall be executed, and for every one enslaved by the enemy or sold into slavery, a rebel soldier shall be placed at hard labor on the public works, and continued at such labor until the other shall be released and receive the treatment due to a prisoner of war. Abraham Lincoln. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Adjutant-General
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.61 (search)
hington under Banks, p. 542.--Editors. was the following: War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, September 2, 1862. Major-General McClellan will have command of the fortifications of Washington and of all the troops for the defense of the capital. By order of Major-General Halleck. In its original form, as it was first given to the newspapers and as it appeared in some of them, this order purported to be issued by order of the Secretary of War.--Editors. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. A few days after this and before I went to the front, Secretary Seward came to my quarters one evening and asked my opinion of the condition of affairs at Harper's Ferry, remarking that he was not at ease on the subject. Harper's Ferry was not at that time in any sense under my control, but I told Mr. Seward that I regarded the arrangements there as exceedingly dangerous; that in my opinion the proper course was to abandon the position and unite the gar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The removal of McClellan. (search)
h, for further orders. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. This order was inclosed: War Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, November 5th, 1862. General orders, No. 182: By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War: E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. If we except Halleck's report of October 28th, obviously called for and furnished as a record, and containing nothing new, no cause or reason has ever been made public, either officially or in any one of the many informal modes in which official action so often finds it convenient to let itself be known. It is hard to credit that the Government did not know, or that knowing they did not appreciate, the military situation on the 5th of November; still ha
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
s put it at a much higher number. It was probably about 2,000. for three or four hours, losing fifteen killed, and seventy wounded. The Confederates reported their loss at one killed and ten wounded. Report of General Rosecrans to Adjutant-General Townsend, September 11th; of General Benham to General Rosecrans, September 13th; of Colonels Lytle and Smith, and Lieutenant-Colonel White, September 11th, 1861; and of General Floyd, to the Confederate Secretary of War, September 12th; also ar bullets that it sank. In this affair the Nationals lost, in killed, wounded, and prisoners, sixty-four men. Among the latter was Major Vogdes. The Confederates lost about one hundred and fifty, Report of Colonel Harvey Brown to Adjutant-General E. D. Townsend, October 11th, 1861; also of Colonel Wm. Wilson to General Arthur, October 14th, 1861; Correspondents of the Atlantic Intelligencer and Augusta Constitutionalist. See map of Pensacola Bay and vicinity, on page 868, volume I. includi
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