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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
s efforts must be made. A hundred of the Black militia are marched into the House, and placed under Campbell's orders. Help is asked from the Federal officers, and in spite of the President's late rebuff this help is given, not only by the army, but the fleet. General Emory sleeps at the Custom House, where his field-guns are supported by a troop of horse. The Commodore lays his ships so as to rake the wharf and sweep Canal Street. A body of Marines is held in readiness to land. General De Trobriand, Emory's second in command, receives orders to proceed at dawn to Royal Street. Sheridan remains at his hotel. Conservative scouts who visit the Rotunda, to observe his motions, find him as usual, dawdling about, puffing his cigar, and laughing with the members of his staff, as though he had no more concern with what is passing at the State House and the arsenals than any other guest in the hotel. Carnival-day is nigh. King Carnival is announced as coming; and the comic writers
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 6: invasion! (search)
and takes the oath from Wiltz. Captain Floyd is voted Serjeant, and Mr. Trezevant nominated Clerk. The House is now composed. Wiltz, as Speaker, invites General De Trobriand to remove the police, who occupy doors and passages, and General De Trobriand obeys his call. The Conservative Chamber, organised under Wiltz, appears to General De Trobriand obeys his call. The Conservative Chamber, organised under Wiltz, appears to be recognised by the Federal troops. Are the scalawags beaten, and the citizens masters of the city? Not yet. Sitting in his room, surrounded by officers, civil and military, Kellogg grows excited and alarmed, as news come in from the adjoining chamber. Spite of his drinking-bars and sleeping-mats, the Conservatives have bes still at his disposal? Wiltz calls for help, and they obey that call. Will they obey his call? He puts them to the test by sending a written order for General De Trobriand to invade the Legislature, and expel the four members who have been admitted to their seats! De Trobriand refers this message to General Emory. Whether