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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 5, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 17: English and American gentlemen (search)
other defect of the English standard is that it perpetuates, even inside those who rank as gentlemen, a permanent feudalism, a wholly artificial standard of social subordination. This lasts even to the present time. In the autobiography of Anthony Trollope there is an especial chapter on the question, How a literary man should treat his social superiors --a chapter which is, to an American literary man, first ludicrous and then pathetic. Walter Besant in his Fifty Years Ago enumerated the lisrway of his liege and amuse that august leisure. That this attitude was not inevitable we know by the very different tone of Burns; but the facility with which Scott fell into it shows the strength of the feudal tradition; while the attitude of Trollope and Besant shows that it still survives. But Scott's letters are of especial value for this: that they absolutely defeat the theory held by many Englishmen and some Americans as to the close resemblance between an aristocracy of birth and one
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 11 (search)
t he did not appear like a poet, but rather like one of our agreeable Southern gentlemen. He seemed a man of every day, or like the typical poet of his own How it Strikes a contemporary. In all this he was, as will be seen later, the very antipodes of Tennyson. He had a large head of German shape, broadening behind, with light and thin gray hair and whitish beard; he had blue eyes, and the most kindly heart. It seemed wholly appropriate that he should turn aside presently to consult Anthony Trollope about some poor author for whom they held funds. He expressed pleasure at finding in me an early subscriber to his Bells and Pomegranates, and told me how he published that series in the original cheap form in order to save his father's money, and that single numbers now sold for ten or fifteen pounds. He was amused at my wrath over some changes which he had made in later editions of those very poems, and readily admitted, on my suggesting it, that they were merely a concession to obt
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
se, Madame, 320. Thomas, C. G., 91. Thompson, William, 198. Thoreau, Miss, 170. Thoreau, H. D., 25, 53, 78, 91, 92, 114, 169, 170, 181, 279, 360. Ticknor, George, 12, 15, 49, 189. Ticknor, W. D., 176. Ticknor & Fields, 183. Tidd, C. P., 228, 229. Todd, Francis, 127. Tolstoi, Count, Leo, 315. Torrey, H. W., 53 58 Tourgueneff (or Turgenev), I. S., 313, 314. Town and Country Club, the, 172. Transcendentalism, 69. Transcendentalists, the, 114. Trenck, Baron, 23. Trollope, Anthony, 287. Trowbridge, C. T., 262. Tubman, Harriet, 328. Tuckerman, Edward, 104. Tuckerman family, the, 75. Tukey, Marshal, 161. Turpin, Richard, 161. Tyndall, John, 272, 289. Underwood, F. H., 176, 178, 182. Ursuline Convent, Burning of the, 34. Usher, R. G., 158. Valentine, in Two gentlemen of Verona, quoted, 271. Vanderbilt, Commodore, 175. Van der Velde, Willem, 79. Van Tromp, Admiral, 103. Venable, Mr., 280. Very, Jones, 54. Village Blacksmith, the, 12.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 31 (search)
immediate contemporaries of her own sex. Madame D'Arblay (Fanny Burney), Miss Porter, Mrs. Opic, and even Miss Edgeworth, are now little read, while Miss Austen's novels seem as if they were written yesterday. But the curious thing is that of the leading novelists in the English tongue to-day it is the men, not the women, who have taken up Miss Austen's work, while the women show more inclination, if not to the big bow-wow style of Scott, at least to the novel of plot and narrative. Anthony Trollope among the lately dead, James and Howells among the living, are the lineal successors of Miss Austen. Perhaps it is an old-fashioned taste which leads me to think that neither of these does his work quite so well as she ; but they all belong to the same photographic school; each sets up his apparatus and takes what my little nephew called a flannelly group of a household, or a few households, leaving the great world of adventure untouched. But what plots and enterprises we obtain in th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, Index. (search)
m, the, 22. T. Taylor, Bayard, quoted, 6. Taylor's theorem, 287. Tennyson, Alfred. Lord, quoted, 76, 123, 249. Also 77, 136, 308. Terry, Ellen, 221. Thackeray, W. M., 55, 138, 173, 180,285. The bread-winners cited, 104. Thomas, E. M., 225. Thompson, Elizabeth, 261. Thoreau, H. D., 285. Tobogganing, 215. Toil, the daughters of, 70. Tourguenieff. J. S., 50, 309. toy of royalty, the, 105. Tracy, Senator, quoted, 98. Trench, Archdeacon, quoted, 14. Trollope, Anthony, 157. trust funds, 187. Tullia or Tulliola, 276. Twain, Mark, 37, 153. 218. U. Uncommonplace, A Plea for the, 192. unreasonable unselfishness, 80. Upton, G. P., 249, 251, 253. V. Vacation, the summer, 215. Vacations for saints, 33. value, who shall fix the, 202. Vassar College, 279. Victoria, Queen, 21,175. victory of the weak, the, 296. Virtue of man and woman the same, 3. visiting the sick, on, 227. voices, 166. Voices, American and En
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
dmitted as a guest through [Sir Frederick] Pollock and Hughes. It is a great satisfaction and honor . . . . As we went through the hall the Archbishop of Canterbury was coming down stairs, Sir Henry Maine, the author was coming from the smoking room, and the three men in the smoking room were Galton, Palgrave and the editor of the Quarterly Review. No building in the world has so many eminent men within its walls from 4 to 6 daily. Then he records meeting at the Cosmopolitan Club, Anthony Trollope, Lord Houghton, whom he knew before, brisk, small, and chatty; and of having a talk with Galton, author of Hereditary Genius. Heard a lecture from Max Muller at the Chapter House of Westminster Abbey. Afterwards I went up to speak to him and found him as pleasant as possible. He remembered at once my Sympathy of Religions which I had sent him and begged me to come to Oxford and see him. He looks quite English in style, but has a sweet sunny manner and slight German accent, about
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, English men of letters. (search)
Mason. Dickens. By A. W. Ward. Dryden. By G. Sainksbury. Fielding. By Austin Dobson. Gibbon. By J. Cotter Morison. Goldsmith.. By William Black. gray. By Edmund Gosse. Hume.. By T. H. Huxley. Johnson. By Leslie Stephen. Keats. By Sidney Colvin. Lamb. By Alfred Ainger. Landor. By Sidney Colvin. Locke. By Prof. Fowler. MacAULAYulay. By J. Cotter Morison. Milton. By Mark Pattison. Pope. By Leslie Stephen. SCOlTT. By R. H. Hutton. Skelley. By J. A. Symonds. Sheridan. By Mrs. Oliphant. Sir Philip Sidney. By J. A. Symonds. Southey. By Prof. Dowden. Spenser. By R. W. Church. Sterne. By H. D. Traill. Swift. By Leslie Stephen. Thackeray. By A. Trollope. Wordsworth. By F. W. H. Myers. New volumes Cloth. 12mo. Price, 75 cents net George Eliot. By Leslie Stephen. William Hazlitt. By Augustine Birrell. Matthew Arnold. By Herbert W. Paul. John Ruskin. By Frederic Harrison. Alfred Tennyson. By Alfred Lyall.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, English men of letters. (search)
y William Black. Cowper. By Goldwin Smith. Byron. By John Nichol. Shelley. By John Addington Symonds. Keats. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Wordsworth. By F. W. H. Myers. Southey. By Edward Dowden. Landor. By Sidney Colvin, M. A. Lamb. By Alfred Ainger. Addison. By W. J. Courthope. Swift. By Leslie Stephen. Scott. By Richard H. Hutton. Burns. By Principal Shairp. Coleridge. By H. D. Traill. Hume. By T. H. Huxley, F. R.S. Locke. By Thomas Fowler. Burke. By John Morley. Fielding. By Austin Dobson. Thackeray. By Anthony Trollope. Dickens. By Adolphus William Ward. Gibbon. By J. Cotter Morison. Carlylze. By John Nichol. Macaulay. By J. Cotter Morison. Sidney. By J. A. Symonds. De Quincey. By David Masson. Sheridan. By Mrs. Oliphant. Pope. By Leslie Stephen. Johnson. By Leslie Stephen. Gray. By Edmund Gosse. Bacon. By R. W. Church. Bunyan. By J. A. Froude. Bentley. By R. C. Jebb. Published by the Macmillan Company 66 Fifth Avenue, New York
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
ar days, Thomas Hughes, and Justin McCarthy, then editing the Morning Star. Invitations to breakfast or dinner came to him from the son and grandson of his early friend, Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, and from Lord Houghton, at whose house he met Anthony Trollope and Hepworth Dixon. Trollope had a low opinion of the negro, and discussed him from the ethnological standpoint in a manner that stirred Mr. Garrison's indignation, and led him to handle the novelist in a vigorous and summary fashion delighTrollope had a low opinion of the negro, and discussed him from the ethnological standpoint in a manner that stirred Mr. Garrison's indignation, and led him to handle the novelist in a vigorous and summary fashion delightful to his host, who recalled the incident ten years later. A day was spent at Richmond with the Duc d'aumale and his nephews, the Comte de Paris and Duc de Chartres, at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Laugel, the latter a daughter of Mrs. Chapman. In addition to all these occupations, Mr. Garrison was besieged by callers at his lodgings, and had little time to prepare himself for the impending demonstration in his honor which he greatly dreaded. Announcement was made, shortly after his
line at, as impossible for white men without degradation (in distinction from mere mechanic employment). Mrs. J. G. Swisshelm relates, in her Half a Century, p. 60 (circa 1838): To a white woman in Louisville, work was a dire disgrace, and one Sabbath four of us sat suffering from thirst, with the pump across the street, when I learned that for me to go for a pitcher of water would be so great a disgrace to the house as to demand my instant expulsion (Cf. Niles' Register, 41: 131). Mrs. Trollope says a Virginia gentleman told her that ever since he had been married he had been accustomed to have a negro girl sleep in the same chamber with himself and wife, and that, being asked why he had this nocturnal attendant, he replied: Good Heaven, if I wanted a glass of water during the night, what would become of me! (Lib. 2: 107). He did it, too, without forfeiting the respect or respectful demeanor of servants, not one of whom, I am sure, ever failed to feel (as they seldom failed
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