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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., Medford market-place made modern. (search)
Medford market-place made modern. A half century ago the ancient home of Dr. Tufts and that across Forest street, where was once the Cotting bakery, were standing, and the town pump in working order. Spot pond water came later with the stone water trough now gone. The railway station and some store fronts have been changed a little, the Bigelow building and Tufts hall have replaced those named. Otherwise the surroundings of the old Medford market-place are the same today. The near future will witness a marked change; indeed it has already begun. The Withington bakery, for several years disused, has been demolished and a theater and business block is there building. Tufts hall, built by Dr. Weymouth in ‘72, the brick building adjoining and the Seccomb house of 1756 (recently known as the City Hall Annex) have all been sold and are all to be removed and a modern business building erected. It is to be hoped that the good taste manifested so long ago by the builders between
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., Turell Tufts and his family connections. (search)
Turell Tufts and his family connections. DR. Simon Tufts, Jr. (1727-1786) married Lucy Dudley (1727-1768), February 23e been published at different times in the register. Turell Tufts, who made the speech of welcome to Lafayette, belonged er her marriage to Benjamin Hall, made her early home. Turell Tufts on the paternal side was fifth in the line of descent fom the John Hall to whom his mother traced her line. Turell Tufts was selectman, 1820—1825 and 1827-1828. He served the the church, whose name he bore. From his own portrait Turell Tufts looks down upon us from the library wall of our local Houng, for this distant relative. This short account of Turell Tufts is fortunately supplemented by that interesting one frooman for investments, or she had the advice of her son, Turell Tufts, who was well versed in town affairs. A broadside of teous account, In this same account there was paid to Turell Tufts one year's interest on second donation to January 1, 18
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., The Tufts family residences. (search)
The Tufts family residences. THE name of Tufts will ever be associated with Medford because of the college that crowns Walnut-tree hill, but its association began two centuries and a half ago in the purchase of Medford lands by that Peter Tuftsesidents there are who remember the old house which was successively the home of the elder and younger Drs. Simon, and Turell Tufts, Esq., at Medford square. This, decrepit with age, was demolished in 1867 and succeeded by the present and soon to be 1872. When Dr. Weymouth at its completion addressed a company gathered there, he submitted the question of a name for the hall it contained, and suggested that of Tufts as appropriate. Adopted by acclamation, as Tufts hall it has ever been known. 1872. When Dr. Weymouth at its completion addressed a company gathered there, he submitted the question of a name for the hall it contained, and suggested that of Tufts as appropriate. Adopted by acclamation, as Tufts hall it has ever been known.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., Medford's sky-scraper—the Tufts Telegraphic tower. (search)
t accident occurred. At the present writing (a month later) the tower has been rebuilt in the same form of construction and at a greater height, is now complete, and is visible in all directions. Seen at a distance, the four steel bars at its corners, with the cross-bars and braces, become merged into one black line against the sky. It is said to be exceeded in height and power by but two radio stations in the country, and capable of communicating with Europe. It is the idea of a recent Tufts graduate, Harold J. Power, who is vice-president of the company who caused its erection. We naturally associate electricity with light, heat and power (no pun is intended by this last word), but we can scarcely think that the late Mr. Charles Tufts, who suggested the college that should put a light on that bleak hill, had any thought of electric light, heat, or the subtle energy utilized by the present lofty structure. Since his time the city of Charlestown, in 1862, constructed a rese
least in the upper stories, and so stated in the June register. But we look in vain therefor. The legend is, Bvilt, 1802; Rebvilt, 1915 but what the craft shown in the front panel may be— ark, viking ship or hydroplane-we are waiting to learn. If Major Jonathan Wade could drop into his old domicile today he might enjoy an uninterrupted view of the market-place, as the City Hall annex, alias Simpson tavern, alias Thomas Seccomb house, the three-story brick house, and the more modern Tufts hall building, have all been razed. But not for long the major's outlook, as a deep cellar has been excavated and built in their places, and a modern mercantile building is in process of erection thereon. We regret that it was necessary to remove the big horse-chestnut tree to which the birds resorted, but it was unavoidable. The excavation of the cellar failed to reveal the treacherous quicksand, said to underlie the spot. But the various alterations and public improvements, notably the