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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stuart's ride around McClellan. (search)
ur retreat. We kept straight on, by Smith's storey through New Kent County to Tunstall's station, on the York River Railroad. I had been in charge of the ConfederatHouse long enough to cut the telegraph wire on that road; thence to proceed to Tunstall's station on the York River Railroad, at which place, the prisoners had informed the general, a company of Federal infantry was posted. At Tunstall's station I was directed to charge the infantry, disperse or capture them, cut the telegraph, a the White House. One man of the Federal party was sent back along the road to Tunstall's station, now only about half a mile off. I supposed, of course, that this messenger was sent to warn the Federal troops at Tunstall's of our approach. I was, however, afterward informed that he galloped through Tunstall's but never stopped, Tunstall's but never stopped, and when some one called to him, What's to pay? he dashed along, calling out, at the top of his voice, Hell's to pay! The road now being clear, we marched on bris
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
parately, but a safe estimate from their losses in the campaign would probably bring the total considerably beyond the Union loss, that of the killed and wounded certainly much higher. Almost the whole of two Union regiments, the 11th Pennsylvania Reserves and the 4th New Jersey, were captured.--Editors. My command was safely withdrawn to the south bank of the river, and the bridges were destroyed soon after sunrise on the 28th. The landing at White House and the railroad south from Tunstall's station were abandoned, the infantry and artillery embarking for Fort Monroe, and the cavalry marching to Yorktown.--Editors. The Prince de Joinville and his two nephews, the Comte de Paris and the Duc de Chartres, were on the field as volunteer aides-de-camp, actively engaged in encouraging the men, carrying messages, and performing other duties of aides. Each of these officers was in the midst of flying musket-balls, and was liable to be struck at any moment [see p. 184]. At one ti