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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
not been engaged, Anderson's Division, of the Third Corps, having been halted to let them pass. Cemetery Hill was not assailable from the town, and I determined, with Johnson's Division, to take possession of a wooded hill to my left, on a line with and commanding Cemetery Hill. Before Johnson got up the Federals were reported moving to our left flank-our extreme left-and I could see what seemed to be his skirmishers in that direction. Before this report could be investigated by Lieutenant T. T. Turner, of my staff, and Lieutenant Robert Early, sent to investigate it, and Johnson placed in position, the night was far advanced. General Lee explains his failure to send positive orders to Ewell to follow up the flying enemy as follows: The attack was not pressed that afternoon, the enemy's force being unknown, and it being considered advisable to await the arrival of the rest of our troops. Orders were sent back to hasten their march, and, in the meantime, every effort was made to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
y at a distance, as both looked dark. To solve the doubt, Lieutenant T. T. Turner, of Ewell's staff, and Robert D. Early, of mine, were sent General Lee should give us, or he may have been halted while Lieutenants Turner and Early were ascertaining if the skirmishers we had seen weat direction. Before this report could be investigated by Lieutenants T. T. Turner, of my staff, and Robert Early, sent to investigate it, anerred to. was unoccupied by the enemy at dark, as reported by Lieutenants Turner and Early, who had gone upon it, and that it commanded their ock at night, I sent orders to Johnson, by Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp T. T. Turner, to take possession of this hill, if he had not already d miles from Gettysburg, and would resume its march at 4 A. M. Lieutenant Turner brought this dispatch to my headquarters, and stated that Gentack until I heard Longstreet's guns open fire on the right. Lieutenant Turner at once returned to General Johnson and delivered these instr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
utant R. S. Folger as having acted with great gallantry throughout the engagements, and also to Captains Linebarger, Morrow, Randle and Smith, and Lieutenant Thompson, who were wounded while gallantly leading their companies to the charge. Captain Turner, commanding the Seventh, was wounded in front of his command, while gallantly leading it forward, and was left on the field. Captain Harris then assumed command, and is well pleased with the gallant bearing of the old Seventh, which was surph and commanding Cemetery Hill. Before Johnson got up the Federals were reported moving to our left flank-our extreme left-and I could see what seemed to be his skirmishers in that direction. Before this report could be investigated by Lieutenant T. T. Turner, of my staff, and Lieutenant Robert Early, sent to investigate it, and Johnson placed in position, the night was far advanced. General Lee explains his failure to send positive orders to Ewell to follow up the flying enemy as follows: T
eding three miles--which was also easy riflerange, and permitted the destruction of the city. The navigation from the sea is better by this route than by Savannah River. To guard against this danger, there were several batteries: First. Turner's Rocks, six guns, four of them ten-inch columbiads, and one eight-inch columbiad. Second. Thunderbolt, twelve guns, of which one was a ten-inch columbiad, and four were eight-inch columbiads. Third. Bartow, with its outpost, Causton's Blh columbiads, and eight eight-inch columbiads, looking upon a deep but narrow and crooked channel. Just in the midst of this net-work of defences lies Whitmarsh Island. Our landing and intrenching here was prevented: first, by the battery of. Turner's Rocks; second, by a battery on its east side of fourteen guns, which, with obstructions, closed the passage by the Little Tybee; third, by an intrenchment, extending diagonally across the island, with small field-works at intervals; fourth, by
ival, I met him with a single friend, he also having a single friend with him. These two gentlemen who were witnesses to what passed were General Hitchcock and Major Turner, both of them formerly members of the army, but who were then residing as citizens, General Hitchcock in the city of St. Louis, and Major Turner but a few mileMajor Turner but a few miles in the country. These gentlemen had both of them been long known to me in the army; they were also well known to General Price, and it was publicly known that they were old and attached friends of each other. Nothing could exceed the harmony of this meeting. General Price appeared to rejoice in the opportunity of declaring Known that our meeting had taken place; that it was perfectly amicable, and that we had but one common purpose; to which I assented, and General Hitchcock and Major Turner were then requested by General Price to prepare a paper for us to sign. They retired a few moments and submitted to us a paper, which we mutually signed, expr
t, at Cross-Keys, they were opposed to three of the enemy's regiments in succession. My staff at Cross-Keys consisted of Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Jones and Major James Barbour, Adjutant-General's Department; Lieutenants G. Campbell Brown, and T. T. Turner, aids; and Captain Hugh M. Nelson, volunteer aid. These officers were much exposed during the day, and were worked hard, over an extensive field. Their services were valuable, and were rendered with zeal and ability. Lieutenant Brown was paisat down, he alone stood erect, went in front and attempted to get the brigade to advance still nearer the enemy. I inclose this report, and recommend the officer to executive favor. Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Jones, Major James Barbour, Lieutenant T. T. Turner, and Captain Hugh M. Nelson, of my staff, rendered valuable service in rallying the broken troops. Lieutenent G. Campbell Brown was absent, owing to the wound received the day previous. I inclose sub-reports of Colonel Scott and Genera
-General's Department; Acting Inspector-General Major James Barbour, and Captain G. C. Brown, A. A. General's Department, and Lieutenant Hugh M. Nelson, A. D. C., who was slightly wounded. At Malvern Hill, the same, with the addition of Lieutenant T. T. Turner, A. D. C. Major B. M. Greene, division C. S., was also with me on the field on both occasions. Respectfully, R. S. Ewell, Brigadier-General. List of Killed, Wounded, and Missing, in the Third Division Army Valley District, in thegiments ordered back to rifle pits. June twenty-ninth, 1862.--The Thirty-eighth Virginia ordered to support Fifty-seventh, at six o'clock A. M. During the last five days, there has been constant skirmishing along the line. Sections of Captain Turner's and Stribbling's artillery companies were in position; the former did good service, and delivered a very effective fire. The enemy did not come within range of the guns of the latter, who was ordered not to fire unless the enemy came into
orse his recommendation for the promotion of Colonel Walker, of the Thirteenth Virginia, to the rank of Brigadier-General. My staff present were, Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Jones and Captain G. Campbell Brown, Adjutant-General department, Lieutenant T. T. Turner, Aid-de-camp, and Lieutenant Richardson, Engineer corps. These officers were, as usual, active and efficient in the performance of their duties. Lieutenant Elliott Johnson, Aid-de-camp to Brigadier-General Garnett, volunteered on my stmies. Second Lieutenant Thomas M. Brown, of company K, was taken prisoner at the time our regiment left the woods. He was afterward found in the woods mortally wounded, and, before dying, stated to Lieutenant Roach, of the Twenty-first, and Captain Turner, of the Irish battalion, that he was taken unhurt, but when the enemy were forced to retreat, they knocked him down with their guns, and bayoneted him in several places. He was in his proper mind at the time of making this statement, and die
aywood is absent, I will submit so much of Captain Turner's report as relates to the part taken by hf the presence of the enemy in our front. Captain Turner, of the Seventh, was immediately sent to tw the enemy retreating in confusion before Captain Turner's skirmishers. We continued to advance unconnecting with those first sent out under Captain Turner. The enemy advanced upon General Gregg inss, and gallantry, and devotion to duty. Captains Turner and Knox, of the Seventh, have on all occ line of battle rested upon the cornfield, Captain Turner, commanding the Fifth Texas, which was on ne. The Fifth Texas, under the command of Captain Turner, moved with spirit across the field, and oore. I herewith transmit the reports of Captain Turner commanding the Fifth Texas regiment; Lieutfore pickets reported the enemy advancing upon Turner and Dr. Perman's road. Captain C. ordered couCorporal W. H. West, privates John R. Fell, T. T. Turner, M. Mount, and W. R. Falconer.--5. Dixie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
ng back. Lieutenant Richmond, of General Polk's staff, indicated to Stewart his position on Cheatham's left. Moving promptly forward, this division struck Reynolds's and swept it out of the way; continuing forward, it met Van Cleve's division, on its way to the relief of Thomas, and drove it in disorder across the State road. While Stewart was executing this daring and brilliant advance, Cheatham, in falling back had reached a strong position, where he halted his line, ran forward Lieutenant Turner's battery, and opened so fierce a fire the centre of Thomas's line gave way just as its left had been struck by Liddell. Thomas, now with Stewart on his right, Cheatham in front and Liddell on his left, was compelled to retire. Stewart, after disposing of Van Cleve, pierced Rosecrans's line and moved across the State road some four hundred yards. Negley and Davis now threatening his rear, made retreat expedient. About sunset he took post about six hundred yards to the east of the ro
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