hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Twiggs or search for Twiggs in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
n of New Mexico, in the shape of invaders from Texas. Like Halleck and Hunter, he attacked the monster quickly and manfully. We have seen the loyal people of Texas bound hand and foot by a civil and military despotism after the treason of General Twiggs. See chapter XI., volume I. The conspirators and their friends had attempted to play a similar game for attaching New Mexico to the intended Confederacy, and to aid Twiggs in giving over Texas to the rule of the Confederates. So early as Twiggs in giving over Texas to the rule of the Confederates. So early as 1860, Secretary Floyd sent Colonel W. H. Loring, of North Carolina (who appears to have been an instrument of the traitor), to command the Department of New Mexico, while Colonel George B. Crittenden, an unworthy son of the venerable Kentucky senator, who had been sent out for the same wicked purpose as Loring, was appointed by the latter, commander of an expedition against the Apaches, which was to start from Fort Staunton in the Spring of 1861. It was the business of these men to attempt the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
e most ample provisions, as they thought, for the sure defense of New Orleans. The infamous General Twiggs, See page 265, volume I. whom the Louisiana insurgents had called to their command, had bs assisted by General Ruggles, a man of considerable energy. Lovell everywhere saw evidences of Twiggs's imbecility; and, when he was informed of the gathering of National ships and soldiers in the Gnsulates were crowded with foreigners depositing Twiggs's House. this was the appearance of Twiggs's residence when the writer visited it, in the spring of 1866. it was a large brick House, at ts paymaster. their money and other valuables for safety from the impending storm; and poor old Twiggs, the traitor, like his former master, Floyd, fearing the wrath of his injured Government, fled f The General left the St. Charles Hotel, and made his military Headquarters in the house of General Twiggs, and his private residence in the fine mansion of Dr. Campbell, on the corner of St. Charles
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
General Blunt estimated the Confederate loss at about 3,000, as his command buried about 1,000 killed on the battle-field. Hindman reported his loss at 1,817, and claimed to have captured 275 prisoners, 5 flags, 23 wagons, and more than 500 small arms. While the war was thus progressing in the region of the lower Mississippi, on its western side, it was seen in many of its distressing aspect still farther west in Texas, the extreme southwestern State of the Republic. From the time when Twiggs betrayed it into the hands of the Confederates, See chapter XI., volume I. the loyal people of that State suffered intensely from the cruelties of the insurgents. In Western Texas, where there were few slave-holders, and consequently more patriotism, the Union element was very strong and pertinacious, and the inhabitants were both hated and feared by the banditti of the conspirators, who moved over the country with fire and rope to destroy property and strangle loyal citizens. The suf