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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Twiggs or search for Twiggs in all documents.

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nearly all the favorites of Mr. Buchanan are engaged in the secession conspiracy. The monstrous transaction of Twiggs, in Texas, which bears the double character of unmitigated treason and individual dishonesty, has been long in process, and the celebrated Ben McCullough, one of Mr. Buchanan's most intimate friends, has been engaged in it. His household editor, William M. Browne, is at Montgomery, assisting disunion with all his ability, while his late Secretary of the Treasury, his late Secretary of War, his late Secretary of the Interior, and most of those who advocated his policy in Congress, either hold position under the Southern Confederacy, or occupy prominent places in the organization which sustains it. --Phila. Press.
An Irish regular.--The following dialogue really took place between Lieutenant A. C. C----d, late of the United States Texan army, and Pat Fletcher, one of the privates of the Second Cavalry, now at Car. lisle, then near Fort Bliss:-- Officer — Well, Pat, ain't you going to follow the General (Twiggs)? Pat--If Gineral Scott ordhers us to folly him, sir, begor Toby (Pat's horse) can gallop as well as the best of 'em. Officer — I mean, won't you leave the abolition army, and join the free South? Pat--Begor I never enlisted in th' abolition army, and never will. I agreed to sarve Uncle Sam for five year, and, the divil a pin mark was made in the contract, with my consint, ever since. When my time is up, if. the army isn't the same as it is now, I won't join it agin. Officer — Pat, the Second (Cavalry) was eighteen months old when you and I joined. The man who raised our gallant regiment is now the Southern President; the man who so lately commanded it, is now a South<
Gen. Twiggs and President Buchanan.--Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am Gen. Twiggs, late of the United States Army, has addressed a letter to Ex-President Buchanan, in which he says:--Your usurped right to dismiss me from the army might be acquiesced in; but you had no right to brand me as a traitor. This was personal, and I shall treat it as such--not through the papers, but in person. I shall, most assuredly, pay a visit to Lancaster for the sole purpose of a personal interview with you. So, sir, prepare yourself. I am well assured that public opinion will sanction any course I may take with you. --Charleston Courier, May 18.