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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Valentine, Edward Virginius 1838- (search)
Valentine, Edward Virginius 1838- Sculptor; born in Richmond, Va., Nov. 12. 1838; received a private education: studied drawing and modelling in Richmond and went to Paris for further study in 1859. On his return to the United States he opened a studio in Richmond and exhibited a statuette of Robert E. Lee. Among his works are portrait busts of General Beauregard, Gen. James E. B. Stuart, Stonewall Jackson, Edwin Booth, and a marble figure of Gen. Robert E. Lee, in the mausoleum of the Memorial Chapel in Washington and Lee University.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
iast in his work, General Johnston never fails to make friends for the Society wherever he goes. We hope to be able before long to announce for him a programme which will go far towards ensuring the success of our effort for permanent endowment. A Confederate soldiers' home for Louisiana was organized in New Orleans in April last, and our friend, Private John H. Murray, advised us that he had sent us an account of its organization; but we regret to say that the paper containing it somehow miscarried, and we must ask for a brief sketch of it for future publication. Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee will be unveiled at Lexington, Va., on the 28th of June, with appropriate ceremonies, a full account of which we hope to give in our next. Meantime we cordially congratulate the Lee Memorial Association on the completion of their labors in the production of one of the most superb works of art in the country, and in so appropriately decorating the grave of our grand old chieftian.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. Remarks of General Early—oration of Major John W. Daniel, Ll.D., of Va.—description of the ceremonies, &c. The occasion of the unveiling of Valentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on thValentine's superb figure of Lee, was one of extraordinary interest, and deserves a place in our records. General J. A. Early, First Vice-President of the Lee Memorial Association, presided on the occasion, called the vast assemblage to order, and called on the Rev. R. J. McBryde, of Lexington, who made an appropriate and fervent prayer. General Early then made the following Introductory remarks. Friends, Comrades and Fellow-Citizens, Ladies and Gentlemen: The sickness of General Joseph E. Johnston, the distinguished President of the Lee Memorial Association, which prevents his attendance here, has devolved on me, as First Vice-President, the unexpected duty of presiding on this occasion; and I am sure no one can regret the cause of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
n his war-smitten city and State. Edward Virginius Valentine was born in the city of Richmond, ViBut keeping in view his chosen course, young Valentine combined with other studies a course of Lectld sculptor died, several years after, while Valentine was still with him, he it was who was among opeless prospect which presented itself when Valentine opened his rooms in his native city. The deays the truth, and purity, and strength of Mr. Valentine's modelling is such that he verifies the r entitled Art in the South, thus speaks of Mr. Valentine: Valentine, of Virginia, is one of the formore than simply re-echo this applause? Mr. Valentine is, it must be remembered, only forty-one s expressive of the feeling in gazing upon Mr. Valentine's creation. The breadth, purity, and trutThere is a great deal of the pure Greek in Mr. Valentine's art sense, and we find it strongly manifave quoted above that the writer of this saw Valentine's original bust of Lee while he was at work [17 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
worthy, as far as any publication can be, of the event it commemorates, and we congratulate our friend, the Rev. J. William Jones, on the impression his Magazine has made. It gives, as its name indicates, a graphic account of the unveiling of Valentine's noble work, the recumbent Lee, and this, of course, includes the introductory remarks of that old hero, General Early, the fine poem by Father Ryan, and the majestic oration by Major John W. Daniel, and a paper full of interest by the editor,owing kindly notice: Southern Historical Papers for August-September should be bought, read and filed in his family archives by every man in the South. It is the Lee number, containing a full account of the ceremonies at the unveiling of Valentine's recumbent statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lexington, Va., on the 28th of June last. The admirably appropriate introductory remarks of General Early, and the supremely forcible and beautiful address of Major Daniel, are too valuable to b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
o, $32.25; in half calf, $35. Let our friends exert themselves to put these volumes in every library in the country. Early's memoir of the last year of the war is written in the happiest vein of this able soldier, and accomplished military writer, and should have a place in every library. By the kindness of the author we have a number of copies which we mail at seventy-five cents each. our Lee number (containing Hon. John W. Daniel's superb oration, an account of the unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent Statue, a beautiful cut of the statue, and much other interesting and valuable matter concerning our grand old chief) has had a wide sale, and has met with universal and enthusiastic approval. We have some copies left which we mail for fifty cents each (regular price for a double number of our Papers), and we would advise those wishing them to order at once. Colonel H. D. Capers, as we announced in our November number, has not been authorized to act as our agent since last
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
ling the greatness of Jefferson on the one hand or of giving offense on the other by recalling the terrible strife of forty years ago. Virginia has the good fortune to possess a sculptor equal to the work of designing the Lee statue. Mr. Edward Virginius Valentine knew him intimately, and made ample studies and notes while the great general was still living as president of what is now known as Washington and Lee University, after the close of the war. What is probably the finest recumbent statue in America marks the tomb of Lee, which adjoins the chapel of the University, at Lexington, and Mr. Valentine is the sculptor who created this masterly monument. We may be assured, therefore, of a notable Lee statue for the galaxy of great Americans in the national Capitol. So that while the North makes no objection, it has been left for Virginians to suggest objections and to say that we are trying to place a statue of Lee on Northern soil. Again, I ask, sir, whose country is this anywa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
ck, Private Francis Charles. Company B —Petersburg A Grays. Brown, Private Samuel E. Chappell, Private Robert; wounded. Cayce, Private Milton; wounded. Chase, Private Henry E.; wounded. Dean, Private Leonidas H.; killed. Fowlkes, Private Joseph C.; wounded. Leavitt, Private Ithman M. Lufsey, Private Henry. Morrison, Private William H. Pollard, Captain Thomas P. Simmons, Private Napoleon B. Smith, Sergeant William C. Tatum, Private L.; killed. Valentine, Private Thomas; wounded. Weaver, Private Christopher; killed. Waller, Private T. J. Company C —Petersburg B Grays. Bird, Corporal Color Guard Henry V. L. Caldwell, Private W. W. Epes, Sergeant Richard; wounded. Evans, George W. Green, Private J. W. Pugh, Private John J.; killed. Rawles, Private W. R.; killed. Sledge, Private Henry. Thompson, Sergeant Robert G. Company D —Petersburg Lafayette guard. Clark, Private John H. Hardy, Private <