hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. You can also browse the collection for Valhalla or search for Valhalla in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 22: Westminster Abbey (search)
hat some day or other the Abbey of Westminster would become the Valhalla of the whole Englishspeak-ing race. I little expected then that a beginning would be made so soon,—a beginning at once painful and gratifying in the highest degree to myself,—with the bust of my friend. Though there be no Academy in England which corresponds to that of France, yet admission to Westminster Abbey forms a sort of posthumous test of literary eminence perhaps as effectual. Every one of us has his own private Valhalla, and it is not apt to be populous. But the conditions of admission to the Abbey are very different. We ought no longer to ask why is so-and-so here, and we ought always to be able to answer the question why such a one is not here. I think that on this occasion I should express the united feeling of the whole English-speaking race in confirming the choice which has been made,—the choice of one whose name is dear to them all, who has inspired their lives and consoled their hearts, and <