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The Daily Dispatch: May 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 47 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 38 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 36 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1863., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1863., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1863., [Electronic resource] 15 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 23, 1863., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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h regiment of New York volunteers, under the command of Colonel William M. Searing, returned to Albany from the seat of war.--A rebel camp near Carthage, Tenn., was surprised by a party of the Twenty-sixth Ohio regiment, who captured twenty-two prisoners, and thirty-five horses, besides destroying all the camp equipage.--Cincinnati Commercial. A large meeting was held at Newark, N. J., by the Democracy of that city, to express their opposition to the recent arrest and banishment of Mr. Vallandigham. There were six thousand persons present, and the sentiments uttered by the various speakers were heartily applauded. Speeches were made by A. J. Rogers, Eli P. Norton, Judge A. R. Speer, and General Theodore Runyon.--New York Daily News. The town of Tappahannock, on the right bank of the Rappahannock River, Va., was this day captured by four Union gunboats. A party of troops landed and carried off and destroyed a large amount of rebel stores, etc. They also captured a large qua
ute in New York, at which an address and resolutions, urging peace in the strongest manner, and denouncing the administration of President Lincoln, were adopted. Speeches were made by Fernando Wood, Judge J. H. McCunn, and others.--General Braxton Bragg, of the rebel army, was confirmed at Chattanooga by Bishop Elliot of the Episcopal Church.--the Democratic Convention of Ohio, by acclamation, nominated C. L. Vallandigham for Governor of that State; the same time refugees reported that Mr. Vallandigham had been imprisoned by the rebels.--Deputy Provost-Marshal Stevens and a Mr. Clayfield, and an enrolling officer who accompanied them, were fired upon near Manville, Rush County, Indiana, when the former was instantly killed. Mr. Clayfield was mortally wounded, and soon after died. The outrage was committed by persons opposed to the draft.--the Forty-fourth regiment of Massachusetts volunteers returned to Boston from Newbern, N. C.--the Assistant Secretary of the Navy stated that the
anna, and established his headquarters at Chambersburgh, Pa.--Governor Andrew G. Curtin issued a proclamation calling upon the people of Pennsylvania to rally for their defence against the rebels who were approaching under General Lee.--General Michael Corcoran, with twelve thousand men, left Suffolk, Va., on a reconnoissance to the Blackwater.--the reply of President Lincoln to the resolutions adopted by the Democrats at Albany, N. Y., on the sixteenth of May, relative to the arrest of Mr. Vallandigham, and the vindication of free speech, was made public.--(Doc. 67.) Major-General David Hunter was relieved of the command of the Department of the South, and Brigadier-General Quincy A. Gillmore assigned to the same.--Governor Oliver P. Morton issued a proclamation to the people of Indiana, warning all persons against resistance to the Government in any form, or hindering the Federal officers in the enforcement of the enrolment laws of the United States.--A skirmish occurred near Mi
eth Ann Thomas, Rufus Choate, and Ripple, were captured by the confederate privateer Tacony.--at Acquia Creek, Va., the quartermaster's buildings, left standing by the Union troops on the evacuation of that place, were burned by the rebels.--Mr. Vallandigham, who was banished to the Southern States for a stated period, arrived at Bermuda in the confederate steamer Lady Davis, from Wilmington. It was reported that Mr. Vallandigham was on his way to Canada, and there to await coming events.--Berme rebels.--Mr. Vallandigham, who was banished to the Southern States for a stated period, arrived at Bermuda in the confederate steamer Lady Davis, from Wilmington. It was reported that Mr. Vallandigham was on his way to Canada, and there to await coming events.--Bermuda Royal Gazette, June 23. The case of the seizure of the suspected gunboat Alexandra, at Liverpool, England, was announced in the Court of the Queen's Bench at London, before Chief Baron Pollock.--(See Supplement, Vol. II.)
fact, this whole two years war, and the two years more war which has yet to be gone through, is itself, in their eyes, only a Presidential campaign, only somewhat more vivacious than ordinary. This explains the Vallandigham peace meetings in New-York and New-Jersey, and the manly declarations of Mr. Horatio Seymour and other patriots. Do not let us forget, says Fernando Wood, writing to the Philadelphia meeting, that those who perpetrate such outrages as the arrest and banishment of Mr. Vallandigham do so as necessary war measures. Let us, therefore, strike at the cause, and declare for peace and against the war. This would sound very well if the said declaring for peace could have any effect whatever in bringing about peace. If a man in falling from a tower could arrest his fall by declaring against it, then the declarations of Democrats against the war might be of some avail. As it is, they resemble that emphatic pronouncement of Mr. Washington Hunt: Let it be proclaimed up
Doc. 129.-Vallandigham's address To the people of Ohio. Niagara falls, Canada West, July 15, 1863. arrested and confined for three weeks in the United States, a prisoner of state; banished thence to the Confederate States, and there held as an alien enemy and prisoner of war, though on parole, fairly and honorably dealt with and given leave to depart — an act possible only by running the blockade, at the hazard of being fired upon by ships flying the flag of my own country, I found myself first a freeman when on British soil. And to-day, under protection of the British flag, I am here to enjoy and in part to exercise the privileges and rights which usurpers insolently deny me at home. The shallow contrivance of the weak despots at Washington and their advisers has been defeated. Nay, it has been turned against them; and I, who was maligned as in secret league with the confederates, having refused when in their midst, under circumstances the most favorable, either to
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
s service or labor thereafter. It was adopted by a vote of 33 against 6. When this bill reached the Lower House, on the 2d of August, it met with strenuous opposition, especially Trumbull's amendment, from Crittenden and Burnet, of Kentucky, Vallandigham, Pendleton, and Cox, of Ohio, and Diven, of New York, chiefly on the ground that it would confirm the belief of the slaveholders that the war was waged for the emancipation of their slaves, and, as a consequence, would produce great exasperatint's signature to it made it law on the same day. This was the first act of Congress, after the beginning of the war, concerning the emancipation of slaves and the confiscation of property. We have already observed the peace propositions of Vallandigham, of Ohio, and Wood, of New York. 2 Volume I., page 578. These were followed, later in the session, after Clarke, of New Hampshire, had asked and obtained leave of the Senate to offer a joint resolution declaratory of the determination of Co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
as a gross violation of the honor of the British flag, for which, according to a resolution offered by Spence, the most ample reparation should be demanded. In concert with these expressions, a sympathizing friend in the American Congress (C. L. Vallandigham, of Ohio) offered a resolution Dec. 16. in the House of Representatives, in which the President was enjoined to maintain the position of approval and adoption by the Government (already assumed by the House) of the act of Captain Wilkes, ireferred to the Committee on Foreign relations. The 16 who voted against laying the resolution on the table were: Messrs. Allen, G. H. Brown, F. A. Conckling, Cox, Cravens, Haight, Holman, Morris, Noble, Nugen, Pendleton, Shier, T. B. Steele, Vallandigham, Vandaver, and C. A. White. Fortunately, better counsels prevailed in Congress, and out of it. the chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign relations (Charles Sumner) approved the action of the Government, and made it the occasion of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
. It must be distinctly understood, said the order, that treason, expressed or implied, will not be tolerated in this department. In defiance of this order (whose specifications of offenses were clear One specification was as follows: The habit of declaring sympathies for the enemy will not be allowed in this department. Persons committing such offenses will be at once arrested, with a view to being tried as above slated, or sent beyond our lines into the lines of their friends. ), Vallandigham continued his seditious speeches, and denounced the order itself. There appeared real fanaticism among the followers of this man, while he was engaged in this campaign against the Government. While he was riding in a procession at Batavia, in Ohio, some of his abject admirers took the more noble horses from his carriage, and drew the vehicle through the village themselves.-Letter of an eye-witness, a friend of the author. He was arrested at his own house in Dayton, Ohio, May 4 1863.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
an of whom was sworn to perform his part of the drama, which contemplated also an invasion of the Northwest, and a formidable uprising there of the sympathizers with the Confederate cause. They reported that General Price was the Grand Commander of the Missouri and Southern members of these secret leagues, and that C. L. Vallandigham was the Grand Commander of the Northern members, composed of the general and local leaders of the Peace Faction, and their dupes. It was also reported that Vallandigham was to enter Ohio boldly from Canada, to take part in the Democratic Convention for nominating a candidate for President, which was to meet at Chicago. It was also discovered that arms were extensively coming into the State, and distributed secretly among the sympathizers with the rebellion; and it was evident to the general that over the Union cause in that region great peril was impending. Rosecrans promptly laid before the Government the information he had gathered, and asked for r
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