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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
diner, Chief Justice Parker, and other friends, I should go to Europe, and study for two or three years. I therefore gave up my office, and turned all my attention and effort to learning what I could of the German language, and German universities, to which my thoughts and wishes had been already turned as the best places for education. The first intimation I ever had on the subject was from Mme. de Stael's work on Germany, then just published. My next came from a pamphlet, published by Villers,—to defend the University of Gottingen from the ill intentions of Jerome Bonaparte, the King of Westphalia,—in which he gave a sketch of the University, and its courses of study. My astonishment at these revelations was increased by an account of its library, given, by an Englishman who had been at Gottingen, to my friend, the Rev. Samuel C. Thacher. I was sure that I should like to study at such a university, but it was in vain that I endeavored to get farther knowledge upon the subject.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
he early history of German literature which he has not found in it. Yet this is the way the Germans are every day judged by foreign nations. Fortunately, however, the grounds of accusation are so different that all cannot be true, and their incoherence and inconsistency are the best possible testimony to the ignorance of the persons who make them. To-day comes a Frenchman, and cries out, like Bonaparte, against the metaphysique tenebreuse du Nord; to-morrow comes another Frenchman, like Villers, and says he will build a bridge that shall conduct the empirics of France to the simplicity of German philosophy. Mad. de Stael complains of Goethe's tragedies for being too simple, and the Edinburgh Reviewers complain of them for being too artificial. You praise the Village Pastor, whose name I have never heard in Germany, except when I have inquired about it. The critics of the North say the reading of Schiller's Robbers makes an epoch in every man's life; from which remark, it is appa
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
. U Ubaldo, Marchese, 175. V Van Buren, Martin, 372, 409. Van Rensselaer, General, 381. Varnhagen Von Ense 495. Vathek. See Beckford. Vaughan, Benjamin, 55, 352 note, 413. Vaughan, John, 15, 55, 352. Vaughan, Mr., 209, 372 and note, 381, 382. Vaughan, William, 55, 58, 263, 352 note, 413. Venice, visits, 162-166. Verplanck, Mr., 381. Victoria, Princess, 435, 437. Vignolles, Rev. Mr., 424. Villafranca, Marques de, 197. Villemain, A. F., 131, 133, 139. Villers, pamphlet in defence of Gottingen University, 11. Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, record of his death, 438. Villiers, Hon., Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Hon. Mrs. Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Mrs., 418. Virginia, visits, 26, 31-38. Vogel von Vogelstein, 482, 490. Volkel, 121. Von der Hagen, 496. Von Raumer, Friedrich, 485. Voss, J. H., 105, 106, 124, 125, 126. Voss, Madame, 125, 126. Voss, Professor, 113. Voyages to and from England, 49, 298, 402. W
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
2. Vedia, Don Enrique de, II. 255. Venice, visits, I. 162-166, II. 97-99, 314, 338. Verplanck, Mr., I. 381. Victoria, Princess, I. 435, 437; Queen, II. 146, 260 note, 429. Vieil-Castel, Count H. de, II 106, 131. Vienna, visits, II. 1-20, 314. Vignolles, Rev. Mr., I. 424. Vilain Quatorze, Count and Countess, II. 90. Villafranca, Marques de, I. 197. Villareal, Duke de, II. 114. Villemain, A. F., I. 131, 133, 139, II. 104, 126, 130, 131, 134, 138, 260, 354, 366. Villers, pamphlet in defence of Gottingen University, I. 11. Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, record of his death, I. 438. Villiers, Hon., Edward, I. 437 and note, II. 148, 180. Villiers, Hon. Mrs. Edward, I. 437 and note, II. 180, 372. Villiers, Mrs., I. 418, II. 147 and note, 148. Virginia, visits, I. 26, 31-38. Visconti Cav., P E., II. 59, 346, 347. Vogel von Vogelstein, I. 482, 490. Volkel, I. 121. Von der Hagen, I. 496. Von Hammnier-Purgstall, Baron, II. 2, 7, 8, 9,
own, when the buildings were immediately fired, and the whole town was reduced to asb s. Later from the Kanawha — the rebels Retreating. Cincinnati, Nov. 12. --Later advices from the Kanawha Valley, Va., State that the rebels, who had been ling Camp Tomams from Cotton hill, retired upon the approach of the force under Col. De Villers. Nine of the enemy's pick is were killed, but there was no loss on our side. Col. De Villers at last account, had taken up a position on the hill. own, when the buildings were immediately fired, and the whole town was reduced to asb s. Later from the Kanawha — the rebels Retreating. Cincinnati, Nov. 12. --Later advices from the Kanawha Valley, Va., State that the rebels, who had been ling Camp Tomams from Cotton hill, retired upon the approach of the force under Col. De Villers. Nine of the enemy's pick is were killed, but there was no loss on our side. Col. De Villers at last account, had taken up a position on the hill
committee. The resolution was laid over indefinitely, and the Senate went into secret session. House of Representatives. Monday, March 31, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Moore. Journal of Saturday read. The Chair announced the appointment of the following gentlemen on the Military Committee, under the resolution passed on Saturday to increase that committee from "nine" to "thirteen," viz: Kentucky, Eli M. Bruce; Louisiana, Mr. Villers; Texas, Mr. Wilcox; Florida, Mr. Hilton; Mr. Chambers, of Miss, in place of Mr. Davis, of Miss, from further service on the committee. Mr. Dargan presented a memorial from citizens of Mobile, which he asked to have referred to the committee on Military Affairs. It was so referred. Mr. Foster, of Ala. introduced a bill entitled an act to encourage the manufacture of iron and copper and the production of ore. He asked the reference of the bill to the Committee on Naval Affairs,
ent of additional officers of artillery for ordnance duties. Also, a bill concerning partisan rangers. Also, an act to regulate promotions in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, and to amend the act entitled an act to provide further for the public defence, approved April 16th, 1862. Mr. Bonham offered a resolution of thanks to Col. Thomas G. Lamar and the officers and soldiers of his command for their brilliant victory over the enemy at Secessionville. Agreed to. Mr. Villers offered a resolution requesting the President to take some steps to secure the exchange of Pierre Soule, now a prisoner at Fort Warren.--Resolution adopted. On motion of Mr. Jones, of Tenn, the House then resolved itself into Committee of the Whole on the President's message and accompanying documents, Mr. Curry, of Ala, in the chair. Mr. Kennan, of Ga, being entitled to the floor, addressed the House in support of the Conscript bill. He alluded to some statements made by the g
ple independently of the American growers: The day was sure to arrive when the general inability to believe in a supply of cotton from other sources than the American cotton States must give way before the facts. That day seems to be near at band. At the end of last week the cargoes from India began to arrive. Upwards of 10,000 bales from Bombay came in during three days, and the quantity from that port actually at sea and at Liverpool was found to be about 397,000 bales; so that Mr. Villers, whose promises were held to be trash when he spoke of 400,000 bales appears to be fully justified in the hopefulness of his tone. The next disclosures was that we have a prospect of a supply, in 1863, of 1,630,000 out of the 4,000,000, which is the largest quantity desired at the ordinary rate of prices. This amount will be just double the quantity used per week for the last three months; and thus it would seem that the worst must be past. At the recent high prices the weekly aver
dwin, and the question coming up upon the amendment as amended, Mr. Miles of S. C. called the eyes and were had as follows: --Messrs Arrington, Asha, Baldwin, Batton, Boyes, Bridges, H. W. Bruce N. M. Bruce, Clapp, Clarke, Clopton, Colder, Dejarne to, Dupre, Foote, Foster, Gardenhier, Garnett, Gartrall, Goods, Hanley, Heiskell, Herbert, Holcombe, Jeness, Kenan of N. C. Lyon, Marshall, Mensess, Miles Miller, Munnerlyn, Perkins, Simpson, Smith of Ala, smith of M. C. Smith of Va. Vast, Villers, Weight of Tenn, and Mr. Speaker--43; Note--Messrs. Barksdale, Burnett. Chambers, Conrad, Conrow, Carry, Elliott, Ewing, Farrow, Freeman, Garland, Graham, Gray, Harris, Hartridge, Hilton, Hodge, Kenner, Lander, Machan, McDowell MoRas, McQueen, Moore Pughkoyston, Sexton, Strickland, Swann, Trippe, Welch and Wilcox--35. The resolutions an amended were then ordered to a third reading, and being placed upon their passage were agreed to. Mr. Barksdale of Miss., introduced a
ch at the Lord Mayor's banquet, deplored the American war. He said England would have interfered, but for the belief that it would have been in vain. She, therefore, would yield neither to blandishments nor menaces; but would remain strictly neutral. Regarding Poland, he said England had done her duty by remonstrating. But although these remonstrances failed, he hoped Russia would cease to pursue an offensive course. Lord Palmerston's reception was significantly enthusiastic. Mr. Villers, a prominent supporter of the Government, had been speaking in defence of the Federals. It was reported that the British Admiral had ordered the Kearsage from Queenstown. It was believed she was shipping men, ostensibly as stokers, but it was supposed for more active service. She sailed on the 5th, and during such had weather that it was inferred her departure was insisted upon. The American ships John Watt and Bold Hunter had been captured by the rebel privateer Georgia. A d