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d attacked the camp of the Sixth regiment New York Volunteers, (Wilson's Zouaves.) Wilson's men were surprised, and driven out of a portion of their camp, which was plundered and burned by the Confederates; but two companies of regulars, under Major Vodges, sent from Fort Pickens to support Wilson, drove the rebels to their boats, and inflicted upon them a considerable loss. Maj. Vodges was taken prisoner. The Union loss was fourteen killed and twenty-nine wounded. No numbers are given of the Maj. Vodges was taken prisoner. The Union loss was fourteen killed and twenty-nine wounded. No numbers are given of the rebel loss, but it was described by themselves as very severe. --(Docs. 34 and 73.) Charges and specifications preferred against General Fremont by Colonel F. P. Blair are published. The charges include neglect of duty and unofficer-like conduct, disobedience of orders, conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman, extravagance and waste of the public moneys, and despotic and tyrannical conduct. Among the specifications are the alleged failure of Fremont to repair to St. Louis and enter
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
. Sir — Your dispatch of April 1st is received. The department regrets that you did not comply with the request of Capt. Vodges to carry into effect the orders of General Scott, sent out by the Crusader under the orders of this department. You will immediately, on the first favorable opportunity after the receipt of this order, afford every facility to Capt. Vodges by boats and other means to enable him to land the troops under his command, it being the wish and intention of the Navy Depad be lost or he be arrested, but he arrived in safety, and delivered the document to Capt. Adams on the 12th of April. Capt. Vodges' company was immediately landed at Fort Pickens. Thus from the time Capt. Vodges arrived and was placed on board thCapt. Vodges arrived and was placed on board the Brooklyn, and from the time of General Scott's orders to land the troops, dated March 12, 1861, twenty-four days elapsed before any thing was done to relieve Fort Pickens, Capt. Slemmer remaining in command of the fort all that time with only twent
aptain Adams, stating, in reply to an interrogatory, that he had a verbal communication from Secretary Cameron to the captain. Owing to a gale which was blowing at the time, Lieutenant Worden did not visit Captain Adams until the following day, when he delivered his orders and received a written reply in return, acknowledging the receipt of the despatches, and stating that they should be executed, together with other verbal information for the Government. Fort Pickens was reinforced by Captain Vodges that night. Lieutenant Worden took the cars at eight P. M. on the 12th on his return, and on the morning of the 13th, when within about five miles of Montgomery, five officers of the rebel army came in and arrested him, taking him to the office of the Adjutant-General at Montgomery. A cabinet meeting was held to decide upon his case, and during the day he was remanded to the custody of a deputy marshal, in whose rooms he remained until the 15th, when he was removed to the county jail
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
epartment of Virginia, to July, 1863. Alvord's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Vodges' Division, Northern District Folly Island, 10th Army Corps, to April, 1ps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Alvord's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of ps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 1863. Alvord's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of ision, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Foster's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, Vodges' Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. Foster's Brigade, Vodges' Division, Folly Island, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of ct, Dept. of the South, to February, 1864. 1st Brigade, Vodges' Division, District of Florida, to April, 1864. 2nd Bri
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, South Carolina Volunteers. (search)
African Descent). Organized at Hilton Head, S. C., June, 1863. Attached to District of Hilton Head, S. C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. South, to January, 1864. Barton's Brigade, District Hilton Head, S. C., to February, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Vodges' Division, District of Florida, to March, 1864. Service. Post duty at Hilton, Head, S. C., till February, 1864. Moved to Jacksonville. Florida, February 6-8, and duty there till March. Designation of Regiment changed to 21st U. S. Coiment Infantry (African Descent). Organized at Fernandina, Florida, July, 1863. Attached to Post of Fernandina, Florida, Dept. South, to January, 1864. Barton's Brigade, District of Hilton Head, S. C., to February, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Vodges' Division, District of Florida, to March, 1864. Service. Duty at Fernandina, Florida, till January, 1864. At Hilton Head, S. C., till February, 1864. Moved to Jacksonville, Florida, February 6-8, and duty there till March. Regiment
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
ed and 11 Officers and 135 Enlisted men by disease. Total 173. 3rd United States Colored Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp William Penn, near Philadelphia, Pa., August 3-10, 1863. Ordered to Dept. of the South. Attached to 4th Brigade, Morris Island, S. C., 10th Corps, Dept. of the South, to November, 1863. 3rd Brigade, Morris Island, S. C., 10th Corps, to January, 1864. Montgomery's Brigade, District of Hilton Head, S. C., 10th Corps, to February, 1864. 2nd Brigade, Vodges' Division, District of Florida, Dept. of the South, to April, 1864. District of Florida, Dept. of the South, to October, 1864. 4th Separate Brigade, District of Florida, Dept. of the South, to July, 1865. Dept. of Florida to October, 1865. Service. Siege of Forts Wagner and Gregg, Morris Island, S. C., August 20-September 7, 1863. Action at Forts Wagner and Gregg August 26. Capture of Forts Wagner and Gregg September 7. Operations against Charleston from Morris Island
ate commissioner, Colonel Edward C. Anderson, reports that an effort was made to bring under discussion the prisoners of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment, but in compliance with instructions, all information or conversation upon these troops was declined. This silence was maintained until the very last. In a correspondence Gillmore accused Beauregard of breach of faith in not exchanging his wounded colored soldiers. Beauregard in reply said that in the arrangements for exchange General Vodges ignored the negroes. He wrote, You chose, sir, to ignore your negro ally after having given him the right or head of your storming column on the 18th of July. In its issue of August 12, 1863, the Charleston Mercury made certain comments and criticisms regarding the treatment of the colored prisoners. This drew from General Beauregard, through his chief of staff, the following letter, which sets forth important information:— headquarters Department of South Carolina. Charleston, S
en displaced, disclosing to the horses' hoofs treacherous quicksands. Early on this morning, Gen. Grant having ordered a general assault on the Confederate position, a spirited attack was made by the Sixth, which was met with obstinate resistance. The Second Corps (Hancock's), upon our left, captured a salient with twenty cannon; the Federal corps was hidden by a thick fog; it broke the abattis, surrounded a division, and took three thousand prisoners, including Generals Edward Johnson and Vodges. This was a complete surprise; these officers were at breakfast. The subsequent experience of our troops through the hours of the 12th was that of a desperate contest with uncertain result. Ten thousand men had fallen upon both sides. It was during these days that Gen. Grant sent his famous despatch to the department, from which was derived the oft-quoted, characteristic declaration, I propose to fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer. The following week was spent in dem
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
an unfortunate accident, great advantage would have accrued. This was a little before day on the morning of the 8th of October,—a few were killed and wounded on both sides, and some prisoners captured by each belligerent. Among the prisoners taken from us was the entire medical corps, (Dr. W. L. Lipscomb, of the Tenth Mississippi included) who had remained with the wounded. The prisoner of the most importance taken from the enemy, and the first prisoner of war I had ever seen, was one Major Vodges. On returning from the Island, and while the machinery of one of our tow-boats was out of order, several of our men were wounded by small arms fired from the enemy on the Island, among them, General Anderson, who was shot in the arm. The bombardment of the 22d and 23d of November, 1861, was commenced by Colonel Brown, commanding Fort Pickens, and in about one-half hour afterwards, responded to by our entire line of fortifications. The enemy's land fortifications were aided by the two
The Daily Dispatch: January 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], Citizens' State-rights ticket.-- Peachy R. Grattan, P. H. Aylett, Geo. W. Randolph. (search)
from Charleston, went to sea yesterday on another peaceful mission. She is ordered to intercept Government vessels heretofore authorized to go into Pensacola and prevent their doing so, in order to obviate trouble--first, by the attempt which the Floridians might make to seize and hold them; and secondly, as consequent upon this State action bloodshed and other serious losses. Before leaving Hampton Roads, however, she received on board, from the fort, two companies of artillery, under Capts. Vodges and Langhorne, a step which, we presume, is only precautionary. Schooner fired on by a Louisiana Fort. The New Orleans Crescent, of the 16th, has the following: Private Julius Elbe, of the First Company Chasseurs a'pied, came up from Fort St. Philip yesterday morning. He reports that at 9 o'clock the night before, a schooner came up the river and anchored opposite the fort; and that, being hailed, and giving no answer, she was fired into from the fort. They were unable
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