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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 159 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 35 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 30 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for James S. Wadsworth or search for James S. Wadsworth in all documents.

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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
ek as the probable line in case of battle. Reynolds, however, prepared to support Buford's line of cavalry, and marched at eight o'clock on the 1st of July with Wadsworth's division and Hall's battery, leaving the other divisions of Doubleday and Robinson with the artillery to follow under General Doubleday, who became commander othe right. These restored the Confederate right, overlapping the Federal left; at the same time Thomas's brigade made successful battle on the left, pushing off Wadsworth's right and Hall's battery, when the two brigades of the Second Division (Robinson's) were sent to their support, but were, in turn, forced back towards Seminartreated through Gettysburg, General Hancock rode upon the field, and under special assignment assumed command at three o'clock. As the retreating troops arrived, Wadsworth's division on the right, the Eleventh Corps across the Baltimore pike, the balance of the First under Doubleday on the left of the Eleventh, General Howard and
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 27: Gettysburg-Second day. (search)
lliptical curve, with his right on Culp's Hill. At an early hour of the 2d the Union army was posted: the Twelfth Corps at Culp's Hill, extending its left to Wadsworth's division of the First; on Wadsworth's left the Eleventh Corps; on the left of the Eleventh the other troops of the First; on their left the Second, and left ofWadsworth's left the Eleventh Corps; on the left of the Eleventh the other troops of the First; on their left the Second, and left of that to Little Round Top the Third Corps; the Fifth Corps stood in reserve across the bend from the right of the Twelfth to the left of the Second Corps. Thus there was formed a field of tremendous power upon a convex curve, which gave the benefit of rapid concentration at any point or points. The natural defences had been imprrossed Rock Creek it was night. The enemy's line to be assaulted was occupied by Greene's brigade of the Twelfth Corps. It was reinforced by three regiments of Wadsworth's division and three from the Eleventh Corps. After brave attack and defence, part of the line was carried, when the fight, after a severe fusillade between the
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
N. Y., Col. William H. Pettes; U. S. Battn., Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Major-General John F. Reynolds, of this Corps, was killed July 1, while in command of the left wing of the Army; General Doubleday commanded the Corps July 1, and General Newton, who was assigned to that command on the 1st, superseded him July 2. Major-General Abner Doubleday, Major-General John Newton. General Headquarters, 1st me. Cav., Co. L, Capt. Constantine Taylor. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth :--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Solomon Meredith, Col. William W. Robinson; 19th Ind., Col. Samuel J. Williams; 24th Mich., Col. Henry A. Morrow, Capt. Albert M. Edwards; 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild, Maj. John Mansfield, Capt. George H. Otis; 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson, Maj. Mark Finnicum. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler; 7th Ind., Col. Ira G. Grover; 76th N. Y., Maj. Andrew J. Grover, Capt. John E. Cook; 84th N. Y. (14th
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
second day an effective flank movement General Wadsworth mortally wounded General Jenkins falls the turnpike and attacked with Griffin's and Wadsworth's divisions. General Lee's orders were a of Carroll and Owen, of Gibbon's division. Wadsworth's division and Baxter's brigade of the Fifthed by Stevenson's division of the Ninth, and Wadsworth of the Fifth was put under his orders. At nine o'clock he attacked with Wadsworth's, Birney's, Stevenson's, and Mott's divisions, and the brig with his three brigades on the left against Wadsworth and Stevenson, pushing them a little. Thtion on the farther side between Field's and Wadsworth's divisions, dashed across and struck the leand, under this concentrating push and fire, Wadsworth fell mortally wounded. In a little while fowords were the last he would utter. When Wadsworth fell the Union battle broke up in hasty retrhe others, had crossed the road to strike at Wadsworth's left before the other regiments were in si[1 more...]