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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 159 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 35 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 30 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for James S. Wadsworth or search for James S. Wadsworth in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.21 (search)
igade, our regiment shared its hardships till the spring of 1865, when its remnant was sent to guard conscripts at Springfield, Ill., and formed the escort at President Lincoln's funeral. At Gettysburg it suffered probably as great a loss as any regiment of its size. One of the first infantry regiments to engage the enemy in the first day's fight, it went into that battle with 28 officers and 468 men; total, 496. It lost that day 24 officers and 339 men; total, 363, of which number 272, or about 55 per cent. of the command, were killed and sounded; 91 were taken prisoners, over a third of whom died in Southern prisons; twice that day was its entire color-guard shot down, and only 3 officers and 95 men were left to respond at roll-call. General Wadsworth thus commended its conduct on that day: Colonel Morrow, the only fault I find with you is that you fought the 24th Michigan too long, but God only knows what would have become of us had you not held the ground as long as you did.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
ieut. Gustav von Blucher; 30th N. Y., Capt. Adolph Voegelee; 32d N. Y., Lieut. George Gaston; K, 1st U. S., Lieut. Lorenzo Thomas, Jr.; C, 3d U. S., Lieut. Henry Meinell; G, 4th U. S., Lieut. Marcus P. Miller; K, 5th U. S., Lieut. David H. Kinzie; C, 32d Mass., Capt. Josiah C. Fuller. Train Guard, 1st N. J. (7 co's), Col. William Birney, Capt. Robert S. Johnston. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds. Escort: L, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Constantine Taylor. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth. First Brigade, Col. Walter Phelps, Jr.: 22d N. Y., Maj. Thomas J. Strong; 24th N. Y., Col. Samuel R. Beardsley; 30th N. Y., Col. Wm. M. Searing; 84th N. Y. (14th Militia), Col. Edward B. Fowler. Brigade loss: w, 37. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler: 7th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Ira G. Grover; 76th N. Y., Col. William P. Wainwright; 95th N. Y., Col. George H. Biddle; 147th N. Y., Col. John G. Butler; 56th Pa., Col. J. William Hofmann. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 25; m, 5 == 33.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
ter, ordering Doubleday and Howard to follow, hastened toward Gettysburg with Wadsworth's small division (two brigades, Meredith's and Cutler's) and Hall's 2d Maine struck by Davis's Confederate brigade on its front and right flank, whereupon Wadsworth, to save it, ordered it to fall back to Seminary Ridge. This order not reachrge portion of his brigade, and pursued the remainder across Willoughby Run. Wadsworth's small division had thus won decided successes against superior numbers, buty opened on both the Federal corps, enfilading Doubleday's line. This caused Wadsworth again to withdraw Cutler to Seminary Ridge, and Reynolds's battery was postedna, part of the train escort, which brought up nearly five hundred fresh men. Wadsworth met them and led them to Culp's Hill, where, under direction of Captain Pattifidence, and it implied also the near approach of his army-corps. He ordered Wadsworth at once to Culp's Hill to secure that important position, and aided by Howard
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.39 (search)
on of infantry and vastly superior numbers. The First Corps moved promptly, covered a distance of nearly eight miles, and the First Division, commanded by General Wadsworth, reached the field about 10 o'clock in the forenoon. In returning for the Second and Third divisions I met John Burns in the field east of the Seminary, w? I informed him that they were just in front, that he would soon overtake them. He then said, with much enthusiasm, I know how to fight, I have fit before! Wadsworth's division was immediately engaged, except the Sixth Wisconsin, held in reserve by General Doubleday's orders. General Robinson and General Rowley were soon up tly engaged, the former on the right of the line, extending to near the Mummasburg road, and the latter in the center between Meredith's and Cutler's brigades of Wadsworth's division. The advantages of position were, perhaps, favorable to us, but in numbers the enemy was vastly superior. We had 6 brigades, numbering, with the a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hancock and Howard in the first day's fight. (search)
idge and to the north-east of the town. A portion of the First Corps, of General Wadsworth's command, was between me and the seminary, taking position near the railry of this division was engaging the enemy at this time. His First Division (Wadsworth's) was located a little to the righ t of the railroad, and his Second Division (Robinson's) on Wadsworth's right. The First Corps, in this position, made a right angle with the Eleventh Corps, the vertex being near the Mummasburg road. The ear the Third Division, Eleventh Corps. At 3:45 P. M. Generals Doubleday and Wadsworth besought me for reenforcements. I directed General Schurz, if he could spare one regiment or more, to send it to reenforce General Wadsworth, and several times sent urgent requests to General Slocum to come to my assistance. To every applic put the troops in position, as I had previously directed, excepting that General Wadsworth's division was sent to occupy a height to the right and rear of our posit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
he movement of troops between it and Willoughby Run, half a mile beyond. South of Major-General Daniel E. Sickles. From a War-time photograph. the Round Top and Devil's Den ridge the country is open, and the principal obstacles to free movement are the fences — generally of stone — which surround the numerous fields. As our troops came up they were assigned to places on the line: the Twelfth Corps, General A. S. Williams,--vice Slocum, commanding the right wing,--to Culp's Hill, on Wadsworth's right; Second Corps to Cemetery Ridge — Hays's and Gibbon's divisions, from Ziegler's to the clump of trees, Caldwell's to the short ridge to its left and rear. This ridge had been occupied by the Third Corps, which was now directed to prolong Caldwell's line to Round Top, relieving Geary's division, which had been stationed during the night on the extreme left, with two regiments at the base of Little Round Top. The Fifth Corps was placed in reserve near the Rock Creek crossing of the <
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The breastworks at Culp's Hill. (search)
it was marched over from that point, which was then the extreme left of our line, and posted on Culp's Hill, its left forming a right angle with the right of General Wadsworth's division of the First Corps. Our brigade, commanded by Brigadier-General George S. Greene and comprising five New York regiments, the 60th, 78th, 102d, 13istance, our extreme right regiment. They advanced a little way, but were checked by the fire of a couple of small regiments borrowed for the emergency from General Wadsworth, and placed in echelon. General Meade hardly mentioned this affair at the breastworks in his original report of the battle, and those who were there thinkn an attack upon it was imminently probable, much to the disgust of his men, as reported. As soon as I received orders to occupy the intrenchments, I applied to Wadsworth and received two regiments, which were placed in rear of my right, behind the points b and d, but sufficiently in the rear to support any part of the line. Th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
. General Meade seemed to manifest resentment against every corps commander who had been instrumental in the choice of Gettysburg as our battle-field. He owed his splendid position there to Buford, Reynolds, and Howard, and the divisions of Wadsworth, Doubleday, and Robinson. Yet all of these officers, except Reynolds, who was killed, suffered marks of his displeasure or were mentioned with the scantiest recognition of their heroic conduct. In Howard's case Congress interposed to do him j Cemetery Ridge. The heroic stand made by John Buford on the Cashtown road on the morning of the 1st of July; the brilliant deployments of his cavalry, holding the enemy in check for hours until Reynolds came up with his leading division under Wadsworth, are barely mentioned. In truth the cavalry under Pleasonton and Buford and Gregg and Kilpatrick, to which General Meade owed so much of his success, and the artillery under General Hunt, equally brilliant in its service, received no adequate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
l P. Mann. Artillery, See artillery brigades attached to army corps and the reserve. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt. U. S. Engineer Battalion, Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John F. Reynolds of this corps was killed July 1st, while in command of the left wing of the army. Maj.-Gen. Abner Doubleday, Maj.-Gen. John Newton. Staff loss: k, 1; w, 1 = 2. General Headquarters: L, 1st Me. Cav., Capt. Constantine Taylor. Loss: k, 1; w, 2 = 3. First division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Wadsworth. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Solomon Meredith, Col. William W. Robinson: 19th Ind., Col. Samuel J. Williams; 24th Mich., Col. Henry A. Morrow (w), Capt. Albert M. Edwards; 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild (w), Maj. John Mansfield (w), Capt. George H. Otis; 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson, Maj. Mark Finnicum. Brigadeloss: k, 162; w, 724; m, 267 = 1153. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lysander Cutler: 7th Ind., Col. Ira G. Grover; 76th N. Y., Maj.