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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Wagner or search for Wagner in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
f the Weehawken delayed her, and caused wild steering along the whole line, so it was about 2.50 P. M. when she was opened on by Moultrie, followed at once by Sumter, and all of the batteries within effective range. The Weehawken was then somewhat above Fort Wagner. At about 3.05 she opened fire on Fort Sumter, followed by the other monitors, at or before they arrived at the same point, the Patapsco at that time employing a 150-pounder rifle, at the angle of Sumter that was in face. From Wagner up, several buoys of different colors were seen; the vessels passed between them and Morris Island, but nor far from them, perhaps within one hundred and fifty yards. It was observed that the different vessels, in bringing the buoys in range with Moultrie or batteries on that shore, received in turn a heavy fire, and it was supposed probable that they marked torpedoes; they certainly served to indicate distance, and the ranges of the guns had been practically established on them, which great
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
the tide rose the monitors closed to within a distance of about four hundred and fifty yards of Wagner, and the Ironsides as near as her draught would permit. After a couple of hours the fort was siontinuing an effective fire at Sumter. In the afternoon the Passaic and Patapsco again attacked Wagner to prevent repairs. The fort opened briskly on them, but in a short time remained silent. Dupreceding the 7th of September. The previous day a steady cannonade had been maintained against Wagner from the land batteries and by the Ironsides, and it was known to the enemy that an assault was an of a fort. On September 5th, General Ripley wrote a confidential letter to the officer commanding Fort Wagner, stating that it was within the contingencies that those works would be evacuated. hat is already mentioned, prevented the access of reinforcements, or their accumulation between Wagner and Gregg. A detachment of seamen and marines, under Captain F. A. Parker, participated in the
of the Navy, in a letter to Lieutenant-General Grant, said: Ships can approach nearer the enemy's works at New Inlet than was anticipated. Their fire can keep the enemy away from their guns. A landing can easily be effected upon the beach north of Fort Fisher, not only of troops, but all their supplies and artillery. This force can have its flanks protected by gunboats. The navy can assist in the siege of Fort Fisher precisely as it covered the operations which resulted in the capture of Wagner. . . . Rear-Admiral Porter will remain off Fort Fisher, continuing a moderate fire to prevent new works from being erected, and the ironclads have proved that they can maintain themselves in spite of bad weather. Under all these circumstances, I invite you to such a military co-operation as will ensure the fall of Fort Fisher, the importance of which has already received your careful consideration. He added that the telegram was sent at the suggestion of the President. On the 31st of De