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Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 12 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. 6 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. You can also browse the collection for Wakefield or search for Wakefield in all documents.

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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
's humor, pathos, clear moral sense, and quick eye for the scenery of life. We do not believe that there is any one who, by birth, breeding, and natural capacity, has had the opportunity to know New England so well as she, or who has the peculiar genius so to profit by the knowledge. Already there have been scenes in The Minister's Wooing that, In their lowness of tone and quiet truth, contrast as charmingly with the humid vagueness of the modern school of novel-writers as The Vicar of Wakefield itself, and we are greatly mistaken if it do not prove to be the most characteristic of Mrs. Stowe's works, and therefore that on which her fame will chiefly rest with posterity. The minister's Wooing was not completed as a serial till December, 1859. Long before its completion Mrs. Stowe received letters from many interested readers, who were as much concerned for the future of her spiritual children, as George Eliot would call them, as if they had been flesh and blood. The follow
ow, with the softest fur, a perfect bunch of loving-kindness, all purr and felicity. I had a good audience last evening, and enjoyed it. My audiences, considering the horse disease and the rains, are amazing. And how they do laugh! We get into regular gales. E. has the real country minister turn-out: horse and buggy, and such a nice horse too. The baby is a beauty, and giggles, and goos, and shouts inquiries with the rising inflection, in the most inspiring manner. November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving wife, H. B.
November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving wife, H. B. S.
ared with, 409; H. W. Beecher's approval of, 476; new edition with introduction sent to George Eliot, 4S3; date of, 490; Whittier's mention of, in poem on seventieth birthday, 502; Holmes' tribute to, in poem on same occasion, 504. U. Upham, Mrs., kindness to H. B. S., 133; visit to, 324. V. Venice, 304. Victoria, Queen, H. B. S.'s interview with, 270; gives her picture to Geo. Peabody, 496. Vizetelly, Henry, first London publisher of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 189, 191. W. Wakefield, reading at, 495. Walnut Hills, picture of, 65; and old home revisited, 499. Waltham, audience inspires reader, 496. Washington, Mrs. Stowe visits soldier son at, 366. Washington on slavery, 141. Water cure, H. B. S. at, 113. We and our neighbors, date of, 491. Webster, Daniel, famous speech of, 143. Weld, Theodore D. in the anti-slavery movement, 81. Western travel, discomforts of, 498. Whately, Archbishop, letter to H. B. S. from, 391. Whitney, A. D. T.,