hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 221 results in 31 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 15: Cedar Run. (search)
of the second brigade fought on, man to man, without rank or method, with bayonet thrusts and muskets dubbed, but borne. back like the angry foam on a mighty wave, toward the high road. The third brigade, also, upon the right of the second, was broken; and on both sides of the way the enemy made a vast irruption, in which half of Early's brigade was involved. On his extreme left, next to Taliaferro stood the famous 13th Virginia, which, under the gallant leading of its sturdy Colonel, J. A. Walker, still showed an unbroken front, and fell back, fighting the flood of enemies. The right regiments of Early, under the immediate eye of their veteran General, held their ground like a rampart. But the Federalists were fast gaining their rear in the open field. It was at this fearful moment that the genius of the storm reared his head amidst the tumultuous billows; and in an instant the threatening tide was turned. Jackson appeared in the mid torrent of the highway, his figure insti
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 8: battles around Richmond. (search)
Harrison's Landing. It was not until this movement that I discovered what had become of the rest of my brigade, and I then ascertained that when the missing regiments had arrived on the battlefield at a different point from that intended, Colonel Walker had taken charge of them. It was dark by that time, and they got in amongst some of the enemy's regiments, when Colonel Walker quietly with: drew them, as the force into which they had got was entirely too strong for him to attack. My brigColonel Walker quietly with: drew them, as the force into which they had got was entirely too strong for him to attack. My brigade did not draw trigger at all, but it sustained a loss of thirtythree in killed and wounded from the artillery fire of the enemy. During the 2nd it commenced raining, and before night the rain was very heavy, continuing all night. After being employed for some time in picking up small arms from the battlefield, my command was moved to a position near where we had been in line, the day before, and there bivouacked with the rest of the brigade, which had returned to that point the night before
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 18: battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
had been hardly given, before the adjutant of Walker's battalion of artillery came galloping to theour right, and I asked Lieutenant Chamberlain, Walker's adjutant, to show the brigade the direction the entire gap in our line, and I ordered Colonel Walker to advance immediately with my own brigadeparticipated in the repulse of the enemy. Colonel Walker advanced, at a double quick, further to thk with heavy loss. As soon as Atkinson and Walker had been ordered forward, Hoke was ordered to ches previously occupied by Archer's brigade. Walker continued to hold the position on the railroadigades, Trimble's under Hoke, and my own under Walker, and the 13th Georgia Regiment held their posithe condition of my command, the separation of Walker from the rest, the fact of Lawton's brigade beions, before dawn on the 14th, Paxton relieved Walker, Hays took the position which Paxton vacated, de, 55 killed and 369 wounded; my own brigade (Walker's), 17 killed and 114 wounded; and in the arti[2 more...]
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
67 Wade, M. C., U. S., 30 Waite's Shop, 353 Walker, Colonel J. A., 78, 84, 95, 99, 100, 109, 111, 122. 123, 131, 133 Walker, General H. H., 326, 354 Walker, General J. A., 135, 136, 143, 149, 155, 158-59, 170-177, 179, 236, 240, 331-334, 352-53 Walker, General J. A., 135, 136, 143, 149, 155, 158-59, 170-177, 179, 236, 240, 331-334, 352-53 Walker's Brigade, 356, 363 Walker's Division, 152 Wallace, General Lew (U. S. A.), 387-88, 392-93 Ward, Colonel, 60, 61, 62, 69, 73 Warren County, 366-367 Warren, General (U. S. A.), 304, 305, 347 Warrenton, 31, 109-10, 165, 285, 304, 307, 479 Walker's Brigade, 356, 363 Walker's Division, 152 Wallace, General Lew (U. S. A.), 387-88, 392-93 Ward, Colonel, 60, 61, 62, 69, 73 Warren County, 366-367 Warren, General (U. S. A.), 304, 305, 347 Warrenton, 31, 109-10, 165, 285, 304, 307, 479 Warrenton Junction, 114, 115, 116, 307 Warrenton Pike, 5. 25, 26, 31-32-33, 37, 114-15, 119, 120-22-23 Warrenton Springs, 106-110 Warwick Court-House, 61 Warwick River, 58, 59, 60, 61, 65 Washington Artillery, 5, 6, 7. 8, 204 WashingtonWalker's Division, 152 Wallace, General Lew (U. S. A.), 387-88, 392-93 Ward, Colonel, 60, 61, 62, 69, 73 Warren County, 366-367 Warren, General (U. S. A.), 304, 305, 347 Warrenton, 31, 109-10, 165, 285, 304, 307, 479 Warrenton Junction, 114, 115, 116, 307 Warrenton Pike, 5. 25, 26, 31-32-33, 37, 114-15, 119, 120-22-23 Warrenton Springs, 106-110 Warwick Court-House, 61 Warwick River, 58, 59, 60, 61, 65 Washington Artillery, 5, 6, 7. 8, 204 Washington College, 380 Washington, D. C., 2, 34, 40-46, 48, 51, 54, 75, 89, 104, 105, 131, 135, 157, 160-61, 253, 263, 344, 358, 360, 371, 383, 385, 386, 389, 390- 394, 398, 401, 416-17, 455, 475 Waterloo Bridge, 108, 109, 110, 114 Watkins, Colonel, 114
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
.-Gen. J. B. Kershaw's division. (d) Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. B. G. Humphreys' Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. Kershaw's (old) Brigade. Second Army corps: Major-General Jubal A. Early, Commanding. Maj.-Gen. John B. Gordon's division. Brig.-Gen. H. T. Hays' Brigade. (e) Brig.-Gen. John Pegram's Brigade. (f) Brig.-Gen. Gordon's Brigade. (g) Brig.-Gen. R. F. Hoke's Brigade. Maj.-Gen. Edward Johnson's division. Stonewall Brig. (Brig.-Gen. J. A. Walker). (h) Brig.-Gen. J. M. Jones' Brigade. (h). Brig.-Gen. Geo. H. Stewart's Brigade.(h). Brig.-Gen. L. A. Stafford's Brigade. (e). Maj.-Gen. R. E. Rodes' division. Brig.-Gen. J. Daniel's Brigade. (i) Brig.-Gen. Geo. Dole's Brigade. (k) Brig.-Gen. S. D. Ramseur's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. C. A. Battle's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. R. D. Johnston's Brigade. (f).. Third Army corps: Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Hill, Commanding. Maj.-Gen. Wm. Mahone's division. (l) Brig.-Gen. J. C. C. Sanders' B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of batteries Gregg and Whitworth, and the Evacuation of Petersburg. (search)
around us every few minutes-one has just struck nearly opposite to us. I am so sorry the. enemy has gained any advantage. Every kind of rumor in circulation; people are flying in every direction; we all try and keep composed. The enemy came under the bank of the river and surprised and took a portion of two companies of the Thirteenth Virginia infantry--they were retaken with slight loss on our side this morning. General Gordon sent word about an hour ago that he can hold his lines. General Walker has sent one of his brigades to the support of General Grimes. They hold a salient of ours at or near the Wilcox house. I hear that General Harris has come over and been sent to retake it. We have just heard General Hill is quite seriously wounded. Mrs. H. is very much excited, much more than any of us. I trust Colonel Pegram has not been killed, as reported. The ambulance committee have reached here from Richmond. E., M., and S. unite in kindest regards for you, and say you must
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
g Hill's headquarters, every thing exhibited. signs of preparation for action. General Lee directed me to assist Colonel Walker in disposing of the artillery of Ilill's corps, and afterward to examine and correct, if necessary, the position of tsed to his right, leaving much of his center and almost his entire left unoccupied. When calling the attention of Colonel Walker to the importance of occupying a ridge springing obliquely from the right of Hill's position, and extending in a direct line towards Round Top mountain, General Pendleton offered his services to Walker; and I proceeded to our left, more than a mile, on the opposite side of Gettysburg. As I examined the position of the artillery on the left, I momentarily expected skirts of Gettysburg, and accompanied him through the town and along Hill's line. On arriving at the point where I left Walker a few hours before, the ridge to which his attention had been called in the morning was still unoccupied; but as this gro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
collect very distinctly that it was dark before we got to the position where we bivouacked for the night. It seems to me we reached the field sooner than sun-set, but not earlier than an hour before sun-set. Yours very truly, (Signed) J. A. Walker. This leaves no doubt that a great mistake has been made, either by General Johnson in the conversation with Colonel Taylor, or by the latter in his recollection of it. The distance of Johnson's march was greater than the highest figure GeGeneral Walker gives. General Longstreet says that his troops were greatly delayed on the 1st by Johnson's division and the trains following it, which came into the road from Shippensburg. Anderson preceded Johnson and halted, somewhere in rear of Hill's line, for him to pass. Johnson had camped the night before somewhere west of South Mountain and north of the Chambersburg road to Gettysburg. On the morning of the 1st Ewell was moving with his troops towards Cashtown, in accordance with th
eenth and Twenty-fifth Virginia regiments, Colonel Walker and Lieutenant-Colonel Duffy, of General E of the enemy turned to meet this new foe. Colonel Walker, commanding Fourth brigade, ordered by the I particularly commend the gallantry of Lieutenant Walker, company E, Forty-fourth Virginia. Therubsequent operations. In this action, Lieutenant Walker, of company E, in the Forty-fourth regimo my support, by General Ewell. I ordered Colonel Walker to move on my right through the woods, andr infantry and artillery, in fact, alone. Colonel Walker's Thirteenth and Twenty-fifth Virginia regve wounded and four missing, not including Colonel Walker's loss, which was small. The names of theicularly commend to you the gallantry of Lieutenant Walker, of company E, Forty-fourth regiment Virgade, and sent Major Holliday to report to Colonel Walker, until I could hear positively and know what to do. Before reporting to Colonel Walker, the Major accidentally met with Lieutenant Garnett, an[1 more...]
was the following indorsement: This report was handed in by General Trimble after the completion of my report. Some portions of it may require explanation, but time is not sufficient to alter mine, already delayed. R. S. Ewell. Colonel Walker's Report. headquarters Thirteenth Virginia, August 2, 1862. Lieutenant G. Campbell Brown, A. A. General: In compliance with instructions from division headquarters, directing me to report the operations of the Fourth brigade at the baeries, the former of six and the latter of four pieces, and Burroughs's battalion of cavalry, in all about seventeen hundred effective men, and crossed the James River at the pontoon bridges, about twelve o'clock M. of that day, and encamped with Walker's brigade, by order of the Major-General commanding, on the Mill road, near the New Market road. The next day we continued the march, at an early hour, following the New Market road, leading toward the enemy's left, and arrived upon the field
1 2 3 4