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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Walker or search for J. A. Walker in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

eenth and Twenty-fifth Virginia regiments, Colonel Walker and Lieutenant-Colonel Duffy, of General E of the enemy turned to meet this new foe. Colonel Walker, commanding Fourth brigade, ordered by the I particularly commend the gallantry of Lieutenant Walker, company E, Forty-fourth Virginia. Therubsequent operations. In this action, Lieutenant Walker, of company E, in the Forty-fourth regimo my support, by General Ewell. I ordered Colonel Walker to move on my right through the woods, andr infantry and artillery, in fact, alone. Colonel Walker's Thirteenth and Twenty-fifth Virginia regve wounded and four missing, not including Colonel Walker's loss, which was small. The names of theicularly commend to you the gallantry of Lieutenant Walker, of company E, Forty-fourth regiment Virgade, and sent Major Holliday to report to Colonel Walker, until I could hear positively and know what to do. Before reporting to Colonel Walker, the Major accidentally met with Lieutenant Garnett, an[1 more...]
was the following indorsement: This report was handed in by General Trimble after the completion of my report. Some portions of it may require explanation, but time is not sufficient to alter mine, already delayed. R. S. Ewell. Colonel Walker's Report. headquarters Thirteenth Virginia, August 2, 1862. Lieutenant G. Campbell Brown, A. A. General: In compliance with instructions from division headquarters, directing me to report the operations of the Fourth brigade at the baeries, the former of six and the latter of four pieces, and Burroughs's battalion of cavalry, in all about seventeen hundred effective men, and crossed the James River at the pontoon bridges, about twelve o'clock M. of that day, and encamped with Walker's brigade, by order of the Major-General commanding, on the Mill road, near the New Market road. The next day we continued the march, at an early hour, following the New Market road, leading toward the enemy's left, and arrived upon the field
of the ground. The temporary confusion on the left was soon overcome, and in a short time the enemy gave way, and our whole line advancing, the artillery moved along the road, unable to cross the brook in front through the field. The pursuit continued until, having crossed a second brook, we came upon a large body of woods. It being deemed advisable to shell these before advancing farther, the batteries of Captains Pegram, Fleet, Braxton, and Latham were placed in position under Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, some eighty or one hundred yards distant, and a heavy fire opened in various directions. After a short time, Captain Pegram's battery was ordered forward, with an infantry brigade, through these woods about a quarter of a mile. It took position just beyond, and opened upon what was thought and proved to be the enemy's camp. A battery was soon opened in reply, and a heavy cannonade was the consequence, for some time, causing Captain Pegram severe loss. His battery, however, ret