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upon the depot, block house, and other buildings occupied by the enemy, while Major McCauley's detachment of Thomas's legion was posted in rear of the battery. Just at this time Lieutenant-Colonel M. A. Haynes, of the artillery, and Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, with a detachment of Thomas's legion, were ordered from Jonesboro to reenforce General Jackson. After this fire had been opened some forty minutes, Colonel Haynes brought gallantly forward at a gallop Lieutenant Graham's section of arervices of Lieutenant-Colonel J. L. Bottles, of the Twenty-sixth Tennessee regiment, who, being absent from his command at Chattanooga, volunteered his services for the occasion. Just as this feat was accomplished by Colonel Giltner, Lieutenant-Colonel Walker's battalion, of Thomas's legion, was thrown out to the left, through a skirt of timber on the left of the enemy's sharp-shooters, and the artillery, led by Colonel Haynes in person, advanced to within two hundred yards of the roads occu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
. Clarke; 25th N. C., Col. Henry M. Rutledge; 26th N. C., Col. Z. B. Vance; 35th N. C., Col. M. W. Ranson (w), Lieut.-Col. O. C. Petway (k); 48th N. C., Col. Robert C. Hill; 49th N. C., Col. S. D. Ramseur (w). Brigade loss: k, 95; w, 453; m, 76 ==624. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Junius Daniel: 43d N. C., Col. T. S. Kenan; 45th N. C., Lieut-Col. J. H. Morehead; 50th N. C., Col. M. D. Craton; Va. Cavalry Battalion, Maj. Edgar Burroughs. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 22 == 24. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John G. Walker, Col. Van H. Manning: 3d Ark., Col. Van H. Manning; 2d Ga. Battalion, Maj. George W. Ross; 27th N. C., Col. John R. Cooke; 46th N. C., Col. E. D. Hall; 30th Va., Col. A. T. Harrison; Va. Cavalry Company, Capt. Edward A. Goodwyn. Brigade loss: w, 12. Artillery, Col. James Deshler: Va. Battery, Capt. James R. Branch; N. C. Battery, Capt. T. H. Brem; Va. Battery, Capt. David A. French; Va. Battery, Capt. Edward Graham. Artillery loss: w, 17. Wise's command (temporarily attached t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
osition behind the Rapidan to await the arrival of General Lee with other forces. Thus on his first meeting with the Confederates in Virginia the new Federal commander went to the rear — a direction he was wholly unused to. At that time General Lee was feeling very certain that Richmond was in no immediate danger from an advance by McClellan's forces. He therefore began at once preparations for a vigorous campaign against Pope. Divisions under Generals R. H. Anderson, Lafayette McLaws, J. G. Walker, and D. H. Hill were left to watch McClellan, with instructions to follow the main body of the army as soon as the Federals were drawn away from Westover. On the 13th of August my command was ordered to Gordonsville, and General Lee accompanied me there. Jackson's troops were stationed on the left of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and I went into camp on the right of Gordonsville. Northward was the Rapidan River, several miles distant. Farther on, at Culpeper Court House, was t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
he number reported by Hatch after Gibbon had been detached), and fought it so vigorously that two brigdes were sent to its assistance. Jenkins's brigade, under Walker, came up at dusk, too late to be in the fight; but it went in on the right of Garnett and took part in the irregular firing which was kept up till a late hour. CColonel Walker's report shows a loss of 3 killed and 29 wounded, which proves that he was but slightly engaged. The tired men of both sides lay down at last to rest within a hundred yards of each other. But now Gibbon was putting in earnest work on the pike. He had a choice brigade, strong in numbers and strong in the pluck of hitt927 Garland100200 Anderson8429 Ripley00  494440 Longstreet's loss must have been less than mine, as he had but four small brigades seriously engaged. Walker reports only thirty-two casualties in Jenkins's brigade; G. T. Anderson had none. Hood speaks lightly of the fight of the two brigades under him. The exact losse
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
Ga. (Regulars), Col. William J. Magill; 7th Ga.,----; 8th Ga.----; 9th Ga.,----; 11th Ga., Maj. F. H. Little; Va. Battery (Wise Art'y), Capt. J. S. Brown (w). Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 8; w, 80; m, 6 = 94. Walker's division, Brig.-Gen. John G. Walker. Walker's Brigade, Col. Van I. Manning (w), Col. E. D. Hall: 3d Ark., Capt. John W. Reedy; 27th N. C., Col. John R., Cooke; 46th N. C., Col. E. D. Hall, Lieut.-Col. William A. Jenkins; 48th N. C., Col. R. C. Hill; 30th Va.,----; Va. Walker's Brigade, Col. Van I. Manning (w), Col. E. D. Hall: 3d Ark., Capt. John W. Reedy; 27th N. C., Col. John R., Cooke; 46th N. C., Col. E. D. Hall, Lieut.-Col. William A. Jenkins; 48th N. C., Col. R. C. Hill; 30th Va.,----; Va. Battery, Capt. Thomas B. French. Brigade loss (in the campaign); k, 140; w, 684; m, 93 = 917. Ransom's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Ransom, Jr.: 24th N. C., Lieut.-Col. John L. Harris; 25th N. C., Col. H. M. Rutledge; 35th N. C., Col. M. W. Ransom; 49th N. C., Lieut.-Col. Lee M. McAfee; Va. Battery, Capt. James R. Branch. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 41; w, 141; m, 4 = 186. Hood's division, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood. Hood's Brigade, Col. W. T. Wofford: 18th Ga., Lieut.-Col. S. Z. Ruff;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.68 (search)
rper's Ferry. for other Harper's Ferry pictures, see Vol. I., pp. 115 to 120, and Vol. II., p. 155.--Editors. by John G. Walker, Major-General, C. S. A. When General Lee began his campaign against Pope I was in command of a division (of threeow the weight of his whole force on that small portion of the Confederate army then with Lee, before Jackson, McLaws, and Walker could effect the capture of Harper's Ferry and go to its assistance. General McClellan did get possession, on the 13thel parlor a young woman of perhaps twenty-five, of rather prepossessing appearance, who claimed to have left View from Walker's position on Loudoun Heights of the Union camp and position on Maryland Heights. From a War-time sketch. Washingtonon's Gap and Turner's Gap, signaled to Jackson that he was ready; whereupon Jackson signaled the order both to McLaws and Walker--Fire at such positions of the enemy as will be most effective. I am, of course, ignorant of what Jackson may have si
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson's intentions at Harper's Ferry. (search)
by the Potomac and Shenandoah from McLaws and Walker, he resorted to signals, and that before the norts to the same effect. Jackson then ordered Walker to wait for McLaws. Every one at headquartersper's Ferry, with the assistance of McLaws and Walker. At 3 o'clock the next morning I was sent by not earlier than 2 P. M., and before that time Walker had opened fire, and Jackson had issued the jo early letter to McLaws must have been sent to Walker. That letter looks to an attack by Walker on dispatch to Jackson from Loudoun Heights says: Walker can't get position to bear on island,--showing that Walker had in some way been instructed with regard to it. (It would seem that Jackson's speciang and before the receipt of the dispatch from Walker, for in it he gives instructions to Walker touin little danger from the firing of McLaws and Walker at the enemy on Bolivar Heights, and that he dwould now be of little consequence had not General Walker attempted to give it such strange form and[25 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Harper's Ferry, Va. September 12-15, 1862. (search)
H. Art'y, Capt. John H. Graham; F, 5th N. Y. H. Art'y, Capt. Eugene McGrath; 12th N. Y. (militia), Col. William G. Ward; 39th N. Y., Maj. Hugo Hildebrandt; 111th N. Y., Col. Jesse Segoine; 115th N. Y., Col. Simeon Sammon; 125th N. Y., Col. George L. Willard; 126th N. Y., Col. Eliakim Sherrill (w), Maj. William H. Baird; Ohio Battery, Capt. Benjamin F. Potts; 32d Ohio, Maj. Sylvester M. Hewitt; 60th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Noah H. Hixon; 87th Ohio, Col. Henry B. Banning; 7th Squadron R. I. Cav., Maj. Augustus W. Corliss; 9th Vermont, Col. George J. Stannard. The total Union loss in the actions on Maryland Heights and at Harper's Ferry and Bolivar Heights was 44 killed, 173 wounded, and 12,520 captured = 12,737. (Most of the wounded were probably counted among the captured.) The Confederate force employed at Harper's Ferry consisted of the commands of Generals Jackson, McLaws (including R. H. Anderson's division), and Walker. For composition of these forces in detail, see pp. 600-602.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in Maryland. (search)
same order he directed General McLaws to march on Harper's Ferry by way of Middletown and seize Maryland Heights, and General Walker to cross the Potomac below Harper's Ferry and take Loudoun Heights, all to be in position on the 12th, except JacksonGeneral White's statements, p. 612.--Editors. Jackson met with so much delay in opening communication with McLaws and Walker, and ascertaining whether they were in position, that much of the 14th was consumed. But late in the afternoon A. P. Hilhis victory. When night came, he started for Shepherdstown with J. R. Jones and Lawton, leaving directions to McLaws and Walker to follow the next morning. He left A. P. Hill behind to finish up with Harper's Ferry. His first order had been to takas killed. Colonel Douglass, commanding Lawton's brigade, was also killed. General Lawton, commanding division, and Colonel Walker, commanding brigade, were severely wounded. More than half of the brigades of Lawton and Hays were either killed or
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
B.--At dawn on the 17th, Hooker and Jackson began a terrible contest which raged in and about the famous corn-field, B, and in the woods, A and C. Jackson's reserves regained the corn-field. Hartsuff's brigade, of Hooker's corps, and Mansfield's corps charged through the corn-field into the Dunker Church wood, General Mansfield being mortally wounded in front of the East Wood. Jackson, with the aid of Hood, and a part of D. H. Hill's division, again cleared the Dunker Church wood. J. G. Walker's division, taken from the extreme right of the Confederate line, charged in support of Jackson and Hood. C.--Sumner's corps formed line of battle in the center, Sedgwick's division facing the East Wood, through which it charged over the corn-field again, and through Dunker Church wood to the edge of the fields beyond. McLaws's division (of Longstreet's corps), just arrived from Harper's Ferry, assisted in driving out Sedgwick, who was forced to retreat northward by the Hagerstown pik
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