Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John G. Walker or search for John G. Walker in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
of the Third Georgia, promoted to brigadier-general, commanded a brigade of Huger's division, which included the Third, Fourth and Twenty-second regiments. Still another Georgia brigade was found in A. P. Hill's light division-Joseph R. Anderson's, made up of the Fourteenth, Thirty-fifth, Forty-fifth and Forty-ninth regiments; and in the same division the Nineteenth was attached to Archer's Tennessee brigade. The Second Georgia battalion, from the department of North Carolina, was with J. G. Walker's brigade. The splendid army with which Lee prepared to thwart the invasion of McClellan, probably the greatest assembled in behalf of the Confederacy during the war, included 186 regiments and battalions of infantry, among which Virginia as the invaded territory properly had 5th, the largest number. Georgia had 38; North Carolina, including the troops of her department, furnished 36; South Carolina, 15; Alabama, 15; Mississippi, 10; Louisiana, 11, and other States smaller numbers.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ed to Frederick City, Md. Thence Jackson's corps and portions of the divisions of McLaws and John G. Walker were diverted westward to attack the 12,000 Federal soldiers at Harper's Ferry, and the remang the previous night. Lawton's brigade, under Col. Marcellus Douglass, and Trimble's under Colonel Walker, of Virginia, sustained a destructive artillery attack at daybreak, followed by an assault on for the first time assumed command of the division. The latter reported of the fight: Colonel Walker, by moving two of his regiments, the Twenty-first Georgia and Twenty-first North Carolina, abrigade of fresh troops came up to the support of Lawton's and Hays' brigades just at this time, Walker ordered an advance, but the brigade which came up having fallen back, he was compelled to halt, s of 554 killed and wounded out of 1, 500, and five regimental commanders out of six. Hays' and Walker's brigades, together hardly equal in numbers to Lawton's, suffered the same loss, including all
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
sion to rejoin the army of Northern Virginia, then on the march into Maryland. He had the hardest part of the work to do at the capture of Harper's Ferry and Maryland heights, being for the time under the command of Stonewall Jackson. After the fall of Harper's Ferry, he marched for Sharpsburg and reached the field just as Jackson and Hood were being forced back before the overwhelming strength of the enemy. Throwing his division immediately to the front, and reinforced soon after by John G. Walker's division, the repulse of the Federals on the Confederate left was made complete. At Fredericksburg, one of his brigades (Barksdale's Mississippians) kept the Federal army from crossing the Rappahannock until Lee was ready for them to come, and it was his division that made the magnificent defense of Marye's hill. At Chancellorsville, he formed the right wing of the Confederate army, and when Sedgwick, having succeeded in running over Marye's heights, was advancing upon Lee's rear, Mc