hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 38 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 71 results in 24 document sections:

1 2 3
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
James R. Griffith, Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry. No. 142Lieut. ol. Allen L. Fahnestock, Eighty-sixth Illinois Infantry. No. 143Lieut. Col. E. Hibbard Topping, One hundred and tenth Illinois Infantry. No. 144Capt. George W. Cook, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry. No. 145Capt. William H. Snodgrass, Twenty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 146Maj. James T. Holmes, Fifty-second Ohio Infantry. No. 147Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. No. 148Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 149Col. Morton C. Hunter, Eighty-second Indiana Infantry. No. 150Col. William P. Robinson, Twenty-third Missouri Infantry, of operations July 10-September 8. No. 151Lieut. Col. Ogden Street, Eleventh Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-30. No. 152Col. Durbin Ward, Seventeenth Ohio Infantry. No. 153Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Lister, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry. No. 154Maj. John H. Jolly, Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operati
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ht. Here we intrenched, skirmished with the enemy daily, took up his picket-line twice, capturing the most of them, until July 27, Major-General Stanley being assigned to command the corps, I came in and assumed command of the division. August 5, relieved of command of the division and assigned as brigadier to the command of the brigade again. On this day, by orders from corps headquarters, the brigade attempted an assault on the enemy's lines and lost 36 men. Among them was the brave Captain Walker, of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, and the gallant young officer, Lieutenant Willard, Thirty-sixth Indiana. August 22, marched at 3 a. m. with six regiments two miles to the left, struck the enemy's out picket-line, drove them, captured 8 prisoners, made a demonstration, and returned with small loss. On the 15th of August the Eighty-fourth Indiana, Lieutenant- Colonel Neff, was transferred into my brigade, and the Fifty-ninth Illinois into the Second Brigade. With frequent skirmi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 28 (search)
the hour designated our skirmishers moved resolutely forward under a galling fire, but without the slightest hesitation or wavering they captured the pits, which they found so near the enemy's main line as to render an attempt to hold them out of the question, and they therefore withdrew at once. In this attack the brigade lost 36 men killed,. wounded, and missing, including Lieutenant Willard, of the Thirtysixth Indiana Infantry, mortally wounded, and that faithful and gallant officer, Captain Walker, of the Seventy-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Infantry, who was killed, falling near the enemy's works. For a list of casualties I refer to the several reports of the regimental commanders. The rare ability and reliability of the officers commanding the several regiments of this brigade, the exact discipline which they preserved, the soldierly qualities of the men under their command, their ease of combined movement, and esprit de corps, render the duties of a brigade com
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
north side of Peach Tree Creek which did good service in preventing the enemy crossing the creek and capturing our trains. From the best and most reasonable accounts I can gather, we were attacked as follows: Bate's division on my left and rear, Walker's on my left front, and Cleburne to the right and rear. The position I held was a key point, which accounts for the vigorous attack made upon me. If I had been driven across the creek Hooker's left flank would have been entirely exposed and sert the angle of the works vacated by General Wood. With these guns, which I put into position, and a few of the pickets who had been driven in alongside of them, this column of Bate's was checked and driven back into the woods. At the same time Walker's (rebel) division attacked my left and center, and almost immediately after another heavy column (Cheatham's, I think) attacked Kimball's right, which at this time was 500 or 600 yards in the advance of General Hooker's line of battle. A portio
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
ost of his dead and wounded where they fell. Had the enemy recovered possession of the hill on which Colonel Blake's and my own brigades were posted, he would have been able to command the plain over which the left of the Twentieth Corps was moving and to enfilade the position to be taken by it, and the desperate efforts made by him to retake the hill are indicated by the loss of many officers of high rank in close proximity to our lines. The troops which attacked our position were Bate's, Walker's, and a part of Cheatham's divisions, esteemed among the best in the rebel service, and prisoners relate that no doubt whatever was felt that we would be swept from the ridge by their superior numbers, or, remaining, would be easily captured by their turning our left and cutting us off from the crossing of the Peach Tree Creek. During the night succeeding the action the enemy was actively engaged with a large force removing his dead and wounded from such parts of the field near our lines a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
Of the living and present I owe it to truth to say that whatever of credit may be due the Eighty-ninth for good conduct in front of the enemy or elsewhere, is mainly due to the judicious advice and sound example of Maj. B. H. Kidder; Capt. J. M. Farquhar, Company B; Capt. F. M. Hobbs, Company H; Capt. W. A. Sampson, Company K; Captain Warren, Company E; Captain Dimick, Company F; Captain Howell, Company G; Captain Comstock, Company I; Captain Robinson and Captain Rigney, Company C, and Lieutenants Walker, Arenschield, Copp, Greenfield, Beecher, Wood, Pease, Tait, Miller, Swickard, Phelps, and Hale, and last, but not least, Lieut. and Adjt. J. M. Grosh and Sergt. Maj. B. O'Connor. I cannot let the occasion pass without bearing testimony to the zeal and efficiency of Surg. H. B. Tuttle and Assist. Surg. P. R. Thombs, both of whom freely exposed their lives to assist the wounded and assuage the pains of the dying. Surgeon Tuttle succumbed to the arduous toil and incessant devotion o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
ops; not engaged, nor no casualties reported. May 14, moved forward again to-day; heavy fighting going on to our left and front; to-night occupied an intrenched line in support of the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps; no casualties. May 15, occupying the same position as yesterday; severe fighting this afternoon to the right and left of us, though nothing serious in our immediate front; casualties are, Private William C. Green (Company B) killed and Corpl. John W. Bartlett, Privates — Walker (Company I), and George Schmith (Company E) wounded. May 16, on its being ascertained that the enemy had left our front, the regiment proceeded back to where the knapsacks had been left, and at 8 a. m. was moving in the direction of Rome, Ga.; bivouacked for the night at 9 p. m., having marched about twenty miles. May 17, moved forward at daylight, marching rapidly; our advance encountered the enemy one mile north of the Oostenaula River, and a lively fight ensued, both forces using artill
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
ly the Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteers at that place, and rejoined the division. In the same interval also Brigadier-General Turchin was compelled to go North for the benefit of his health, and the command of the brigade devolved upon Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio, who has retained it until this time. July 17, pontoon bridges having been completed at Pace's Ferry, and the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Division He also has, by expiration of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services throughout the campaign, merit reward, and I recommend them for p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
ionary, picketing the riverbank. In the interval the Twenty-third Regiment Missouri Volunteers, assigned by Major-General Thomas to my First Brigade, came up and joined the command. The Second Brigade likewise came forward from Marietta, leaving only the Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteers at that place, and rejoined the division. In the same interval also Brigadier-General Turchin was compelled to go North for the benefit of his health, and the command of the brigade devolved upon Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio, who has retained it until this time. July 17, pontoon bridges having been completed at Pace's Ferry, and the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day wa
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Battle of Jonesborough. (search)
sign, thus inflicting a great loss upon the service. Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, the brave and accomplished commander of the Second Brigade at Chickamauga and at Mission Ridge, remained with the command until the end of June. He also has, by expiration of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services throughout the campaign, merit reward, and I recommend them for promotion or brevets. To the officers of my staff my own thanks and the gratitude of the command are due for the efficient manner in which their duties have been performed, and the promptness with which we have been kept supplied. Those who have rem
1 2 3