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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 3 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
Pretences; or, both sides of good Society, all played in 1856, become caricature of a descending quality. Perhaps the most clever of the later comedies of social life is Americans in Paris by W. H. Hurlbert, performed in 1858. In romantic comedy, there was very little that could compare with the achievement in romantic tragedy. The Deformed, played in 1830, by Richard Penn Smith, has some real merit, though it owes much to Dekker. Tortesa, the Usurer, by N. P. Willis, was played by J. W. Wallack in 1839 in New York and later in England, where Lester Wallack played Angelo to his father's Tortesa. It is an excellent play, and the last act, in which the usurer rises to the dignity of self-sacrifice, is especially appealing. Another play in which the two Wallacks were associated, The Veteran (1859), written by Lester Wallack, is an entertaining comedy laid in France and Algeria. Boker's Betrothal has already been mentioned. Mrs. Mowatt's Armand, or The Child cf the People, produ
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
assachusetts Bay, a, 126 Vindication of the New England churches, 52 Virgil, 165 Virgin of the sun, the, 219, 224 Virginia-Centinel, the, 118 Virginia Company, 5 Virginia gazette, the, 117, 118, 120, 121 Vision of Columbus, the, 169, 170 Voltaire, 91, 110, 116, 119, 165, 188 Voyage dans la Haute Pennsylvanie, 199 Voyage en Amerique (Chateaubriand), 212 Voyage to the Moon, 320 W Waldimar, 224 Wales, Prince of (1614), 15 Walker, William, 227 Wallack, J. W., 230 Wallack, Lester, 230, 232 Waller, Edmund, 158, 159 Walsh, Robert, 208, 237 Wandering boys, 231 Wansey, Henry, 202 Ward, Nathaniel, 39-41, 154 Ware, Henry, 350 Ware, William, 324 Warren, 221 Warren, Mrs., Mercy, 217, 218, 218 n. Wars of New England with the Eastern Indians, 25 Washington, 91, 139, 140, 141, 144, 46, 168, 190, 195, 198, 202, 225, 226, 245, 258, 295 Washington and the Theatre, 216 n. Watch-tower, 18 Water-Witch, the, 300 Watson,
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eminent women of the drama. (search)
mmon knowledge, that it were needless to dwell upon them. It should be mentioned, though, that the play of Leah is an American adaptation of the German drama of Deborah, by Dr. Mosenthal, made by Mr. Augustin Daly. Miss Bateman's first appearance as Leah was made in Boston; but subsequently, for nearly a year, she starred the country in that character, and everywhere attained new popularity. Her first representation of it in New York was given at Niblo's Garden, in January, 1863. Mr. J. W. Wallack, Jr., and Mr. Edwin Adams appeared in the cast, as Nathan, the apostate Jew, and Rudolph, the lover. In the autumn of that year, Miss Bateman, accompanied by her father as manager, proceeded to London, where Leah was produced in October, having just been revised and revamped by Mr. John Oxenford, dramatic critic of the London Times. That the performance was a success may readily be seen in the remarkable fact that it was repeated for two hundred and eleven nights in succession, before c
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. (search)
ew poet; but a nature so intense, a personality so strong as hers, is rarely understood or estimated at its worth. On the one hand she was assaulted with flattery, and on the other with abuse. She went steadily on her way, saying such wittily sharp things of her detractors that it argued no small courage in a man to couch a lance at her,--still studying like an undergraduate, still writing with the industry of a country parson,--and in 1857 publishing The world's own, --a play produced at Wallack's Theatre, in New York. It was brilliant, full of dramatic feeling, and well managed, but lacked a certain theatrical suppleness, a stage-effectiveness, without which it could not succeed. In 1859 Dr. and Mrs. Howe accompanied the dying Theodore Parker to Cuba. A charming book of travels, witty, brilliant, airy, and graceful, was her account of this journey, published first in the Atlantic monthly, and then, with additions, in a volume which she called A trip to Cuba. Fun is very near