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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1860., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
real merit, though it owes much to Dekker. Tortesa, the Usurer, by N. P. Willis, was played by J. W. Wallack in 1839 in New York and later in England, where Lester Wallack played Angelo to his father's Tortesa. It is an excellent play, and the last act, in which the usurer rises to the dignity of self-sacrifice, is especially appealing. Another play in which the two Wallacks were associated, The Veteran (1859), written by Lester Wallack, is an entertaining comedy laid in France and Algeria. Boker's Betrothal has already been mentioned. Mrs. Mowatt's Armand, or The Child cf the People, produced in 1847 in New York and in 1849 in London, is a blank verd it is perhaps fruitless to speculate. There were signs of a quickening of dramatic interest in the late fifties under the encouragement of such managers as Lester Wallack and Laura Keene, but the domination of the stage by Dion Boucicault and John Brougham, while it resulted in some significant plays, especially in a later peri
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
6 Vindication of the New England churches, 52 Virgil, 165 Virgin of the sun, the, 219, 224 Virginia-Centinel, the, 118 Virginia Company, 5 Virginia gazette, the, 117, 118, 120, 121 Vision of Columbus, the, 169, 170 Voltaire, 91, 110, 116, 119, 165, 188 Voyage dans la Haute Pennsylvanie, 199 Voyage en Amerique (Chateaubriand), 212 Voyage to the Moon, 320 W Waldimar, 224 Wales, Prince of (1614), 15 Walker, William, 227 Wallack, J. W., 230 Wallack, Lester, 230, 232 Waller, Edmund, 158, 159 Walsh, Robert, 208, 237 Wandering boys, 231 Wansey, Henry, 202 Ward, Nathaniel, 39-41, 154 Ware, Henry, 350 Ware, William, 324 Warren, 221 Warren, Mrs., Mercy, 217, 218, 218 n. Wars of New England with the Eastern Indians, 25 Washington, 91, 139, 140, 141, 144, 46, 168, 190, 195, 198, 202, 225, 226, 245, 258, 295 Washington and the Theatre, 216 n. Watch-tower, 18 Water-Witch, the, 300 Watson, Bishop, 91 Watteau,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
on of the Wallacks was distinctly English, Lester Wallack (1819-1888) romantically masked his old En he was true to his English taste. To see Lester Wallack at his best, one had to see him as ShakespThe British tradition seemed so natural to Lester Wallack [writes Brander Matthews], so inevitable, vedly call Boucicault's The poor of New York (Wallack's Theatre, 8 December, 1857) or Daly's Under atilda Heron does for her version of Camille (Wallack's Broome St. Theatre, 22 January, 1857), or Aare, 16 September, 1879), Wallack's Rosedale (Wallack's Theatre, 30 September, 1863), Olive Logan'sd was identified with the names of Palmer and Wallack; and though he cannot be said to have been a 1884) and Henry Guy Carleton's Victor Durand (Wallack's Theatre, 18 December, 1884). But these were satirical fun one saw in The Sultan of Sulu (Wallack's Theatre, 29 December, 1902), The County chaseating capacity of three thousand and leased Wallack's on Broadway, then the largest and finest th[5 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
luptates Apianae, 573 Von Raumer, 578 Voyage of Verrazano, the, 186 Wachsner, Leon, 587, 589, 590 Wack, H. W., 163 Wade, Benjamin F., 148 Wages and capital, 443 Wages question, the, 441 Wagner, 634 Wagoner of the Alleghanies, the, 48 Waiilatpu, its rise and fall, 137 Wail of a protected manufacturer, 429 Walam Olum, 612, 619, 620, 62, 623 Walker, Amasa, 435 Walker, Francis A., 358, 440, 441 Wallace, Gen., Lew, 74-5, 89 Wallace, William, 239, 523 Wallack, Lester, 269, 275, 278 Wallacks, The, 267, 269 Wallet of time, the, 273 Walpole, 487 Walras, 442 Walter, Eugene, 289, 290, 293 Wander-lovers, the, 51, 52 War between the States, 351 Ward, Lester, 265 Ward, S. G., 488 Warden, D. B., 432 Ware, N. A., 434 Ware, William, 75 Warfield, David, 281 Warheit, the, 601 Warner, Anne, 69 Warner, Charles Dudley, 5, 14, 112, 123– 125, 164, 310 Warner, Susan, 69 War powers, 348 Warren, josiah, 437 Warren, Samue
an double that of the President of the United States. Mr. Forrest gets even a shade still better terms, and even many stock actors receive a steady yearly income higher than that of our Secretaries of State. Mr. Brougham received last season, at Wallack's, $175 a week, besides benefits and allowances for his pieces; Mr. Lester Wallack receives $125 a week; Mr. Blake $115, and Mr. Walcot $100. At the Winter Garden and Niblo's, Messrs. Couldock and Dyott receive $70 and $50, and Messrs. Conway anMr. Lester Wallack receives $125 a week; Mr. Blake $115, and Mr. Walcot $100. At the Winter Garden and Niblo's, Messrs. Couldock and Dyott receive $70 and $50, and Messrs. Conway and Fisher $70 and $80 respectively a week. At Miss Keene's this season there are no high salaries, ut at the opening of the last she paid Mr. Jordan $100. Last season, too, Mrs. John Wood and Mr. Jefferson received each $150 a week under the management of Mr. Stuart.--Neither Garrick, nor Betterton, nor Munden, nor Dowton received one-half this sum in their best days. No wonder, with such increasing salary of artists, and diminution in the price of admission, that managers now-a-days never real